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National Sandwich Month

Sharpen Your Sandwich Skills

As National Sandwich Month rolls on, we continue celebrating by enjoying scrumptious sandwiches. If you are looking to improve your sandwich making skills, check out some of these smart sandwich hacks.

  • It’s Got To Be Serrated
    When it comes to cutting sandwiches, always use a serrated knife to avoid a smashed mess. Because a serrated knife “saws” through your sandwich, it is less likely to result in a flattened or squashed sandwich. Whether you cut your sandwiches straight down the middle or diagonally is at your discretion.
  • No Mayo? No Problem!
    Instead of reaching for the mayo, try an avocado. Simply mash the avocado and spread it on your bread like you would with mayo. Not only is it healthier, but it can add a new element of flavor to your sandwiches.
  • Sturdy Sandwich
    No one likes it when their sandwich falls apart. To prevent this, layer the heaviest ingredients first, such as your meat and cheese. Next, add the medium weight ingredients like tomatoes or avocado, and then top it off with light toppings like lettuce.
  • Wrapping Technique
    Packing a sandwich for lunch or going on a picnic? Using the proper wrapping technique will prevent your sandwich from becoming soggy or squished. Start by wrapping your sandwich in a layer of parchment paper. This breathable wrap will prevent sogginess. Next, put the wrapped sandwich in a sturdy food container to keep it from getting squashed.
  • PB&J Time
    If you’re making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, to eat not or a little later, try spreading peanut butter on both pieces of bread (feel free to use as much or as little as you please). The peanut butter on both slices will prevent the jelly from bleeding through the bread.
  • Tastier Tomatoes
    After slicing your tomatoes, place the slices on a paper towel before putting them in your sandwich. This will prevent sogginess and gives you a chance to season your tomatoes beforehand.
  • Bread Variety
    If you want to switch up your sandwich routine, you can try changing the bread. Pita pockets, bagels or English muffins are great substitutes.
  • Cover It Up
    If you are using round meat slices, there’s a trick to maximizing your bread coverage. For the round meat slices into quarters and place them in each corner of the bread. Then continue adding until your bread is covered.
  • Prep It Good
    Assemble the interior of the sandwich by layering condiments in between slices of meat and cheese. Put each sandwich interior into a ziplock bag and store them in the fridge or freezer. When you need a sandwich in a hurry, just grab a bag and a couple of slices of bread and you’re all set!
  • Toasting Trick
    Love toasted bread but not the way it can tear up your mouth? Next time, put both slices of bread into the same toaster slot. The outsides will get toasted while the insides stay soft.

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Don’t feel like making your own sandwich? Not a problem! Enjoy one of our yummy signature sandwiches in our dining room, on the patio, or have it delivered to your door. Find us on DoorDash or UberEATS, or visit us at 105 E. Arrow Highway in Pomona (on the northeast corner of Garey Avenue and Arrow Highway next to Johnny’s).

Healthy Benefits Of Peanut Butter & Jelly

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are a classic American favorite, and with good reason – they’re delicious! While these sandwiches may evoke sweet childhood memories or provide an occasional sweet treat, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches also provide some surprising health benefits. Read more to find out how healthy this yummy sandwich can be.

Protein
Protein contributes to healthy muscles, skin, hair, and teeth and plays a role in hormonal function. It also helps to keep blood healthy. A serving of peanut butter (2 tbsp) contains about 8g of protein, and using whole wheat bread can increase your protein intake.

Fiber
Fiber promotes regularity in digestion and helps control cholesterol levels. It also helps to keep you full longer. Luckily, jelly made from all fruit contains more fiber than other varieties, and peanut butter contains 2g per serving.

Healthy Fats
Did you know peanuts are a good source of heart-healthy fats? Unsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of developing heart disease. They also help your brain, skin, and even provide an energy boost. Peanut butter can provide some of these benefits, and, in moderation, jelly can be a healthy part of a low-fat and heart-healthy diet.

Antioxidants
Vitamin E is an antioxidant found in peanuts and can help protect your body from free-radical damage that contributes to the development of cancer and heart disease. In addition, resveratrol is another antioxidant found in peanuts and peanut butter that has potential to protect you from cancer and heart problems. It also has anti-aging, anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties, and offers protection for healthy brain function.

Vitamins
Jelly is made with fruit, thus, you increase your vitamin C intake when you consume it. Vitamin C is important for immunity, would healing and the health of your teeth and gums. While jelly contains trace amounts of some B vitamins, peanut butter is good source of several B vitamins, which are necessary for your body to use the energy it gets from the foods you eat. Niacin is one of the B vitamins found in peanut butter, and one serving offers 24% of your daily needs. And adequate intake of niacin could reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Another B vitamin found in peanut butter is folate, which helps prevent birth defects in gestating infants.

Minerals
As a whole, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich contains a few minerals including potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and calcium. Potassium helps to regulate a healthy blood pressure while magnesium and calcium play role in healthy bones. Zinc is important for vision and wound healing, and iron is a necessary nutrient for healthy blood oxygenation.

Did you know August is National Sandwich Month? Share your favorite sandwiches with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Stop by and celebrate National Sandwich Month with your favorite signature sandwiches from the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli! We’re open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm & Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. We also offer delivery via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Around The World In Sandwiches

In honor of National Sandwich Month and our undying love for sandwiches, we decided to take a tour of the signature sandwiches from around the world.

Grilled Cheese // America
There’s nothing quite like a good Grilled Cheese sandwich. Sure, there are plenty of American sandwiches to choose from, but the grilled cheese is a classic.

The traditional recipes calls for sliced cheese layered between two slices of white bread smeared with butter on either side. The sandwich is then grilled until the bread is crisp and the cheese is gooey. However, you can find a multitude of variations on this, for example, our 3-Cheese Grilled Cheese Sandwich.

Smørrebrød // Denmark
The translation of smørrebrød is simply “buttered bread,” but there’s more than that to this Scandinavian sandwich. It starts with a very dense and thick slice of rye bread that is slathered with butter, sour cream, or some sort of horseradish schmear. Traditionally, toppings include pickled or smoked fish, liver pate, sliced cold cuts, and boiled eggs, but this open faced sandwich can be topped with whatever your heart desires.

The different texture and flavor combinations are endless and reason enough to try this unconventional sandwich.

Falafel // Egypt
Falafel is made of ground chickpeas, finely chopped onions, fresh herbs, and Middle Eastern spices mixed together then shaped into 1.5 inch balls. These are then deep fried until golden. The falafel balls are stuffed into warm pita and served with different fillings, such as shepherd’s salad (cucumber, tomato, and green peppers) and brightly colored pickles, such as hot pink turnips, green cucumbers, and deep red beets. You may also find a delicious spread of hummus, baba ganoush, white sauce (yogurt or tahini based), or spicy harissa pepper sauce.

Tramezzini // Italy
Tramezzini are iconic Italian finger sandwiches, which are very similar to English tea sandwiches. These small triangular sandwiches are made with crust-less, soft white bread and homemade mayonnaise. You can purchase and enjoy these between breakfast and lunch at many restaurants and bars in Venice, Italy.

Though the filling options are endless, good, homemade mayonnaise and soft, crust-less white bread are essential.

Croque Monsieur // France
The Croque Monsieur contains sliced ham, Dijon mustard and gruyere (or sometimes Swiss) cheese between two thick slices of buttered bread. Next, the sandwich gets fried, like a grilled cheese, and covered with a rich and creamy béchamel sauce. Lastly, the entire sandwich with sauce goes under the broiler until the top is crispy. Top this with a fried or poached egg and you get a Croque Madame.

Cemita // Mexico
The Cemita comes from the Puebla region of Mexico and these sandwiches are typically stuffed with a variety of fried meats, avocado, queso, chipotles and red sauce. So what is the difference between a cemita and a torta? While the recipes are similar and versatile, they differ in their city of origin. Regardless of which one you order, you are sure to enjoy a great blend of flavors and textures.

Cucumber Tea Sandwich // England
Again, there were many sandwich options to choose from, including the chip butty, the Ploughman’s Lunch, and the Christmas Leftover sandwich. However, the English Tea sandwich reigns supreme as the traditional staple of the United Kingdom. And much like the tramezzini, there are endless varieties, but the most classic has to be the cucumber, cream cheese, and white bread tea sandwich.

Gyro // Greece
In Greece, street vendors can be seen shaving meat off of vertical grills and stuffing them into fresh pitas filled with tzatziki, French fries, and fresh vegetables. And there, gyros are more commonly filled with chicken or pork, rather than shaved lamb like we are accustomed to in America.

Choripan // Argentina
If you guessed that choripan is made with grilled chorizo and crusty bread, you are correct. A combination of beef and pork ground together in a sausage-like form  is then split down the middle and griddled until crispy. That is then placed on some crusty bread and topped with chimichurri sauce and fresh salsa. Sometimes you may see it served with fried shoestring potatoes.

Arepa // Colombia
This popular Colombian food is eaten daily. Although arepas are often prepared for immediate consumption and the recipe calls for fresh, handmade dough, you can find pre-prepared arepas at grocery stores in the U.S. and South America.

Much like the other sandwiches on this list, and sandwiches in general, filling options are endless. A common and beloved favorite includes a sweet corn arepa stuffed with black beans, plantains, crumbled queso fresco cheese and avocado.

Steamed Buns // China
These Taiwanese mouth-shaped buns are also known as gua bao, and are gaining traction thanks to Chef David Chang of Momofuku. If you haven’t already, you will see more steamed buns dishes being added to different menus.

Typically, a light and fluffy steamed bun is filled with meats, pickles, fresh herbs, crushed peanuts, and hot sauce. But again, there are numerous filling variations, such as BBQ pork belly with pickles to deep fried tofu with crushed peanuts and everything in between.

Medianoche // Cuba
Nearly identical to the Cuban sandwich found here, the Medianoche contains roasted pork, Swiss cheese, mustard and dill pickles, but on a pressed, sweet, yolky bread similar to challah. The bread is the distinctive factor so be sure to skip the Cuban bread and find the sweet Medianoche bread at most Latin American grocery stores.

Bánh Mì // Vietnam
The bánh mì is made with a Vietnamese baguette (similar to a French baguette) stuffed with some kind of grilled meat (ex. pork belly), pate, pickled carrots and daikon, jalapeños, cucumbers, French mayonnaise, Sriracha, fresh cilantro, and fresh mint. Talk about a mouthful of flavor!

Doner Kebab // Turkey
This Turkish delight is served a as street food around Eastern Europe. Similar to a gyro, seasoned meat is skewered onto a spear and them slow roasted on a vertical flame. The meat is then shaved off with an electric razor, and drops down to a griddle to crisp up. The meat, fresh vegetables and a variety of sauces are then stuffed into a warm piece of lavash flat bread and, as the finishing touch, the whole thing is grilled.

Smoked Meat Sandwich // Canada
Imagine a combination of pastrami and corned beef and you can get a general idea of Canada’s smoked meat sandwich.

For the Montreal Smoked Meat Sandwich, Kosher brisket is brined and corned for over a week, then gets hot-smoked and steamed until it melts in your mouth. The meat is stacked high (around 4-5 inches) between two slices of soft rye seedless bread with a smear of yellow mustard.

Fun Fact: The little bits of meat left after slicing the brisket are saved and used for other delicious Montreal specialties such as poutine.

Share your own favorite sandwiches from around the world! Connect with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

At the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli, we serve a variety of signature sandwiches made to order. Add one of our craft sodas, a deli salad or chips, and one of our baked goods to round out your meal. Explore our menu online or visit us in store weekdays from 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays from 8:00am-4:30pm.