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Helpful tips

Making Sandwich Bread

If you’ve ever tried making homemade sandwich bread, you know it does not always go as planned. One misstep and you can end up with flat loaves, soggy middles or crumbly bread. Whether it’s your first or fiftieth time trying, here are some common sandwich bread making mistakes and tips to avoid them.

  • Under-kneading (or over-kneading) your dough.
    Under-kneaded dough often results in a lack of structure, holes in the middle, or will fall apart when you cut the loaf. Over-kneaded dough will produce dense, dry, and crumbly loaves.To avoid both, constantly check your dough during kneading rather than going by the time listed in the recipe. Keep kneading if it puddles in your hand or feels limp. Stop kneading if it starts to feel very tight in your hands. Your dough is ready when it is smooth, holds its shape in a ball, and springs back when you poke it.
  • Adding too much flour.
    We use flour to prevent the dough from sticking, but if you add too much, you can end up with dry, crumbly bread.If the dough seems too sticky when you begin, let it rest in the bowl for 30 minutes. This will give the flour time to absorb the liquid in the dough, making it less sticky and easier to knead. You may also try folding the dough rather than kneading it, as is the technique for sourdough bread.
  • Not shaping your loaf well enough.
    Once you shape your dough into a loaf and put it in the pan, it should have a taut, springy surface. Limp or loose loaves won’t rise properly and can end up flat and dense.You want to shape your dough by patting it down into a rectangle and then folding it like a letter. Then fold it in half again and make sure the surface is taut and smooth.
  • Not baking your bread long enough.
    No one wants under-baked bread. It will look dry and crusty on the outside, while the middle will still be gooey.To prevent this, use a thermometer. Fully baked sandwich loaves should be at least 190°F and no more than 210°F in the middle. Another trick is to slip the loaf out of the pan and thump the bottom – it should sound hollow. To err on the side of caution when you’re in doubt, bake your loaf a little longer.
  • Slicing your bread before it has cooled.
    As tempting as it may be to cut into a warm, freshly baked loaf of bread, please refrain. The cool down period is still a part of the cooking process, allowing the moisture inside to evaporate and the bread to firm up. If you cut your bread too soon, it may seem soggy or under-baked and your leftover bread will go stale much faster.Patience is the answer. It can take around two hours for a sandwich loaf to fully cool down – the bread should no longer feel warm on the sides or bottom when you touch it.

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Join the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli for breakfast or lunch six days a week! Breakfast is served until 10:30am and we are open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Scrumptious Salad Tips

Salads don’t have to be bland or boring. With the right skills, fresh ingredients, and proper execution, you can enjoy a scrumptious and satisfying salad. These simple rules and tips will help you improve your salad skills.

Before getting started, there are some general rules you should follow:

  • Quality

Since a salad is basically a mishmash of veggies and produce, in order to create a delicious salad you must start with quality ingredients. Shop and eat seasonally and locally for an exceptional salad (and a more sustainable meal). Most products at farmer’s markets are picked within 24 hours of being sold so you are pretty much guaranteed fresh, prime produce.

  • Variety

Say no to bland, boring salads. Incorporating a variety of ingredients, textures, shapes, and sizes is vital to creating complex flavors and textures within your salad.

  • Chopping

Smaller pieces mean your fork can pick up more different items for a more exciting bite. Chop your ingredients finely, especially your lettuce or greens. You can even learn how to chop different shapes and styles for more diversity in your salad.

Making The Salad
Now that you have reviewed these basic rules, it is time to make your salad.

Variety of Greens
By mixing different types of lettuce, you not only introduce new flavors and textures, but you also diversify the nutrient content of your salad. You can even go beyond leafy greens and use things like grains, other vegetables, or even legumes or beans as your base.

Season Your Greens
Before adding any dressing or toppings, season your greens with salt and pepper. This minor detail can really add to your salad overall. And really, you should be seasoning your food at every level to build a more complex flavor profile (your taste buds will thank you). In addition, you may consider adding fresh chopped herbs and citrus zest during this step.

Dressing
With salad dressing, a little goes a long way, so dress lightly. Remember, you can always add more, but you can’t take it back. Add a little at a time and taste it as you go. For a more even coating, use your freshly washed hands to mix it all up.

Make Your Own Dressing
Homemade dressing is worth the extra effort – you can control the ingredients and adjust it to your liking. In general, dressing should have a good balance of fat, acidity, and flavor. And different greens pair with different flavors. Remember, pair bold with bold and light with light.

  • Arugula – The slightly bitter and peppery flavor is best balanced with sweetness, like a balsamic reduction.
  • Kale – Be sure to massage kale thoroughly and then dress it lightly with an acidic or creamy dressing.
  • Spring/Summer Mixes and Tender Lettuces (Boston bibb, butter lettuce) – Simple vinaigrettes and citronettes (olive oil, acidity, salt and pepper) work well with these simple greens.
  • Spinach – Because spinach wilts easily, you should use a simple dressing (honey or Dijon vinaigrette, bacon dressing) at the last minute.
  • Romaine – Because it is very versatile, it can work with any type of dressing.
  • Watercress – This can be extremely bitter, so it is best to embrace fat, creaminess and sweetness.
  • Iceberg – Creamy dressing can help build the bland flavor of iceberg lettuce.
  • Grains – These are also very versatile, thus, can handle any dressing. Remember to dress grains while they are still warm for better absorption.

Texture & Toppings
Aim for at least one from each category.

  • Crunch – Add texture with things like nuts, seeds, croutons (homemade), parmesan crisps, roasted chickpeas or lentils.
  • Grains – Bulk up your salad and stay full longer with grains like quinoa, bulgur, couscous, barley, farro, or wheat berries.
  • Protein: Protein can help round out your salad and keep you satiated. Try beans, lentils, roasted tofu, poached eggs, falafel, grilled chicken, or salmon.
  • Optional items include fats (avocado, cheese), fresh fruit (pomegranate seeds, tart green apples), or roasted veggies (broccoli, cauliflower, butternut squash). And remember, leftovers sometimes make the best salad toppings.

The finished product is a salad that you will enjoy as it includes your favorite foods and flavors with various textures – an absolute treat for your taste buds. It make sound like a lot of work, but if you do a little prep at the beginning of the week, such as washing and drying your produce, chopping veggies, or making a large batch of grains, assembling a satisfying salad won’t be so bad.

Have any other salad tips to share? Connect with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Visit the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. Dine in, order to-go, or have our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Healthy Tips For Dining Out

There are several reasons for dining out at a restaurant. Whether it’s a new hot spot you’ve had your eye on, for a social gathering, or simply a much-needed break from the kitchen, you deserve a nice night out. And while it is great to treat yourself, it does not mean you have to abandon your diet completely.

Despite hidden calories and large portions, there are ways to create a delicious and healthy restaurant dining experience.

Healthier Choices

  • Just say no to appetizers, which are usually loaded with unnecessary calories. If you want to start with an appetizer, a green salad with dressing on the side is a better option.
  • To prevent overeating, you should aim to fill half of your plate with fruit and/or vegetables (and no, potatoes do not count), and the other half with lean protein and whole grains.
  • Skip the sodium-laden soups. Instead, go for a salad, which offers less sodium and more potassium-rich veggies.
  • Restaurant portions are notorious for being oversized, so, if you can, order a lunch portion, box up half of your meal for later, or split an entrée with a friend.
  • As tempting as they may be, bypass the complimentary bread or chips. These fillers will just stuff you with unnecessary and empty calories and carbs.

Salads

  • Choose Darker Greens – Darker greens have more nutrients per serving than the popular romaine or iceberg lettuce.
  • Pick A Good Protein – Good protein choices include egg whites, egg slices, grilled tofu, tuna, beans, chicken, and seafood.
  • Cut The Cheese – You really don’t need the cheese, do you? Skip the excess calories, saturated fat, and sodium that cheese provides.
  • Smart Toppings – Instead of adding crunch from oily, refined flour (crispy wontons, croutons) and salty sodium bombs (olives, bacon), add crisp veggies and fruit to add more texture and flavor. Load up on nutrient-dense toppings such as broccoli, carrots, chickpeas, black beans, edamame, roasted peppers blueberries, mango, or strawberries.
  • Dress Better – It’s always wise to get the dressing on the side so that you can control how much or how little dressing you use. You may even be able to create your our dressing using oil and vinegar.

Sandwiches

  • Whole Wheat > White Bread – Always a better choice as it provides more nutrients. And please note that “multigrain” may mean more white flour than whole wheat.
  • Avoid Wraps – Unless they are whole grain, skip the wraps (they can have up to as many calories as white bread). Or try a lettuce wrap. You can drop refined grains for whole food. And if you’re feeling adventurous, turn your sandwich into a salad.
  • Craving a sandwich? Opt for a half sandwich, half salad combo. That way, you can get your sandwich fix while taking in more vegetables, too.
  • Smart Sides – When it comes to side dishes, opt for fresh fruit or steamed veggies over chips or bread.

Coffee

  • Choose Nonfat Milk – If you don’t particularly like nonfat, take baby steps and do half nonfat, half 2% milk.
  • Pros & Cons Of Non-Dairy Milk – Soy milk provides around 8g of protein per cup, but depending on the brand, they may have added sugar. Almond milk may have less sugar, but also less protein. Skip the coconut milk as it is low in protein and high in saturated fat.
  • Skip The Whipped Cream – Save yourself from excess calories and saturated fat.
  • Skip The Syrup – Sugar-free syrups may be made with unsafe sweeteners, but if you must, ask for a single pump of regular syrup.
  • Order Brewed Coffee and make your own modifications (one packet of sugar adds about 20 calories.

How do you stay healthy when you dine out? Share your tips with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

At the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli, we serve a variety of signature sandwiches and salads made to order. Visit us in store, online or have our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS. We also provide catering for business lunches, special events and parties. Call 909-596-5225 to learn more!

Make Better Salads

As simple as salads seem, sometimes when you make them yourself, they just don’t taste as good as restaurant salads. It’s not you, but it might be your technique. Here are some tips and tricks to perfect your healthy salad-making skills.

  • Always Use Fresh, In-Season Ingredients
    Produce always tastes best at the peak of freshness, which is why a quick trip to the farmer’s market could yield a great batch of salad ingredients.
  • Use A Salad Spinner
    Be sure to wash your greens and get them as dry as possible before starting your salad (the dressing will stick better). The paper towel method can be tedious and time-consuming, but a salad spinner is designed to effectively and efficiently dry your leaves. If you don’t have one already, you may want to consider investing in one.
  • Get Creative With Ingredients
    Lettuce doesn’t always have to be the base of your salad. Get creative and try quinoa or farro or even shredded carrots. In addition, you can change up your toppings. For example, you can try nuts or seeds or roasted veggies. Experiment with ingredients that you like and you just might discover your new favorite salad.
  • Add More Flavor
    Try adding fresh herbs into your salad base or squeeze some fresh lime or lemon juice over the top. And if you like spice, you can try fresh cracked pepper or something bolder like your favorite hot sauce. The possibilities are endless.
  • Balance Textures
    As with most other meals, you want to balance soft and creamy ingredients (ex. avocado, goat cheese) with something crunchy (ex. nuts, croutons). The contrasting textures often work well together.
  • Consider Your Protein
    Before adding your protein, think about the flavors that will complement what you already have. Rather than sticking to safe choices (shredded rotisserie chicken, unseasoned baked chicken), marinate your meat in spices/sauces that will work with your salad.
  • Add Cheese Just Before Eating
    If you’re adding cheese to your salad, be sure to shred or shave it just before you are about to eat. Pre-shredded cheese often dries out easier and loses flavor. By shaving or shredding your cheese just before your meal, you retain the moisture and flavor for a better tasting salad.
  • Want Creamier Salad Dressing?
    Sometimes your store-bought or home-made dressings can be a little on the thin side, causing it to simply slip right off your salad ingredients. When this happens, an easy way to thicken it up is to add some fat-free Greek yogurt. This will also give your dressing a creamier consistency without adding too many calories.
  • Dress Wisely
    While on the topics of dressings, be mindful of your dressing portions. Too much or too little dressing can really mess up a salad. It’s best to err on the lighter side since you can always add more dressing as needed, but you can’t take it away.

If you don’t want to make your salad at home, come on down to the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli! With our Mixed Greens salad, you choose the toppings and we do the work. Visit www.BrickMarketDeli.com for more information on our menu or call 909-596-5225 if you have any questions. You can also stay up-to-date by following us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Freezing Your Fruits & Vegetables

National Fresh Fruits and Vegetables is coming to a close, so what better way to end it than to share tips on how to properly freeze your delicious produce to better preserve flavors and nutrients. First things first, let’s go over some basic rules.

  • Go For Ripe: Even after freezing, quality decreases over time, so it’s best to choose blemish-free produce at peak ripeness.
  • Pack It Up: Resealable freezer bags are your best bet, as they’re designed for freezing foods and are sturdier, decreasing the likeliness of tears or leaks (which causes freezer burn). If your only options are plastic wrap or standard resealable options, double up on layers or bags for extra protection.
  • Seal Out Air: Oxygen is the enemy. Consider investing in a vacuum sealer, which locks out air and potentially extends the shelf life for up to a year or longer. Alternately, you can stick a straw in a corner of the seal to suck out air before closing.
  • Mark It: To minimize food waste, be sure to list and date the contents of your bags. This helps you recognize what they are, prompting you to use the older stuff first. A good rule of thumb – You have six to twelve months to use frozen goods. If foods are covered in ice crystals or smell “off,” ditch them.

The Process
Some foods are ready to freeze, others need to be prepared first.

Ready To Go:

  • Berries – Remove any stems, then freeze whole.
  • Chili Peppers – Ideal for freezing as is. For less heat, scrape out the seeds beforehand.
  • Cherries – Some prefer to pit cherries before freezing, but it’s actually easier after. When they defrost, the flesh surrounding the pit weakens.
  • Corn – Cobs and kernels can be frozen, as long as you’ll be eating them within a month or two.
  • Figs – Freeze whole.
  • Tomatoes – Freeze whole; the skins slip right off after defrosting. If space is limited, you can chop first, then freeze in a bag.

Prep First:

  • Bell Peppers – Thinly slice or chop before freezing. For stuffed peppers, remove stems and scrape our seeds of halved bell peppers before freezing; stuff them while frozen.
  • Cucumbers – Thinly slice or chop before freezing. While the texture is compromised once frozen, but the flavor is not. Use these for drinks (DIY spa water), juicing, or smoothies.
  • Herbs – Chop herbs and divide among an empty ice cube tray. Top off each cube with olive oil so it fills the crevices and forces out any air, then freeze. Once frozen, transfer to a bag.
  • Melons – Cut melons into cubes or slices, removing the rind, then freeze on a baking sheet.
  • Stone Fruit (apricots, nectarines, peaches, plums) – Slice and remove the pit. For smoothies, leave the peel on. For pies or tarts, peel and slice before freezing.
  • Bananas – Peel then freeze whole or chopped into chunks.

Cook First:
The enzymes in some fruits and veggies will continue to break down even when frozen, but heat can halt this process.

  • Eggplant – These can be sliced into rounds (eggplant parm) or cut into smaller shapes (pastas and stir-fries); roast before freezing. Cooked eggplant can also be pureed then frozen.
  • Green Beans – Prepare the pods the way you’ll most likely use them – whole or cut into bitesize pieces. Blanch then freeze. These can be added straight to soup or stir-fries without defrosting.
  • Okra – Blanch the pods whole for three to four minutes, then freeze whole or in rounds.
  • Summer Squash/Zucchini – Cut squash into rounds and blanch for three minutes. For baked goods, grate and steam for one to two minutes. Thoroughly drain, then freeze and pack for storage. For grated squash, defrost completely, and then blot away excess moisture pre-use.

Do you have any other tips to share? Connect with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Visit us for the best sandwiches made from the finest and freshest ingredients available. We are located at 105 E Arrow Hwy in Pomona (northeast corner of Garey Ave and E Arrow Hwy – next to Johnny’s) and are open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. You can also get our yummy sandwiches delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS!

Spruce Up Your Salads

Commonly associated as “diet food,” salads are often shunned and overgeneralized as “boring” or “bland.” People assume that they sacrifice flavor for lower calories, but that is not always the case. There are many ways that salads can shine. Find out what salad mistakes you may be making and ways to make your salads better.

Try Something New
If your default salad base is iceberg lettuce, you should start to think outside of the box (unless, of course, you’re making a wedge salad). Now that spring is here, your local farmers’ market will likely have new seasonal leafy greens, such as dandelion greens, microgreens, baby kale, chicory, or escarole. Try something new and delight in the new flavors and textures you discover.

Dry Those Greens
Soggy salads are not ideal and are often the result of improperly dried greens. Investing in a salad spinner or the like can really perk up your salads. Or you can go the DIY route – line a plastic shopping bag with paper towels, throw your washed greens in, tie a knot, and then spin that bag in the air a few times. Your greens should mostly be dry and then you may proceed.

Season Before Dressing
If you’re only using dressing to flavor your salad, you’re missing out. After drying your greens, be sure to season them with salt and pepper. This adds another layer of flavor and may keep you from over-seasoning your dressing or overdressing your salad later.

Dress To Impress
Like pairing wine with food, you must properly pair your dressing with your greens. You want to match the bold with the bold and the light with the light. For example, mild arugula would be better paired with a simple lemon dressing rather than a bold and creamy Caesar dressing, whereas kale can handle a rich dressing and may overpower a light balsamic vinaigrette.

Aside from finding flavors that work together, you want to balance the dressing-to-salad ratio. Overdressing leads to sogginess while underdressing will make your salad feel incomplete. To prevent this, add dressing little by little and taste it as you go.

Use Your Hands
Toss those salad tongs and dig in with your (clean) hands. Using your hands to toss allows air to get into your mix and evenly incorporates your ingredients. Tip: Drizzle your dressing along the walls of your bowl and then lightly toss your greens until the dressing is evenly distributed. This helps to avoid bruised or crushed leaves, too!

Timing Is Everything
Instead of tossing it all together at the same time, timing your ingredients can help to keep your salad fresh and delicious. Adding a portion of heavy ingredients (such as nuts, seeds, tomatoes, or peas) in for the toss allows for better distribution. Adding the rest as a topping at the end allows your guests to see everything that is in the salad and get a little bit of everything.

In addition, you will want to dress your greens before adding any herbs. This assures that the herb flavor will stand out as an outer layer.

Have you made any tragic salad mistakes? Have other salad wisdom to impart? Share your stories and advice with us on Facebook, Google+, Twittter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Let us make your favorite salads and sandwiches for you! Visit the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli, located on the northeastern corner of Garey Ave & E Arrow Hwy, weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Dining In Restaurants With Kids

Going out to a restaurant with young children is not always an easy task. Kids are unpredictable, and in a restaurant setting, you really never know what will happen. For the more upscale restaurants, here are some helpful tips for restaurant dining with kids.

Inform The Restaurant
Call ahead to make a reservation and let the staff know you will be bringing a baby or young child. They may not have high chairs or room for a stroller so that would be beneficial to know beforehand. You may also want to request a larger table on an end so that your child cannot reach everything and wreak havoc.

Dine During Off-Hours
If you can, eat earlier. The restaurant will likely be less crowded, or populated with other families. However, if you must dine during peak hours, it might help. The restaurant may be packed, and likely very noisy, possibly drowning out your child’s screams or songs.

Get Food ASAP
It is in your best interest to order your child’s food as soon as you are seated. If not, be sure to bring snacks and take those out as soon as you get your table.

New Foods Are Your Friends
Try a variety of dishes and let your child try something new (if they haven’t moved onto the “picky eater” stage yet). You might think you know what your kid likes, but you could be surprised.

Talk A Walk
When your child starts to get fussy, take a walk outside or explore the restaurant. A change of scenery or some movement should help to calm him or her down. But please, stay out of the way of the servers.

Know When To Say When
Toys, books, or iPads could be your secret weapon, but be sure to use them when it is absolutely necessary, rather than whipping them out immediately. Also, if you’re eyeing dessert or an after-dinner drink, but your child is about ready to explode, it will probably be better to get the check and go.

Have any other tips to share? Connect with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

The Brick Your Neighborhood Deli fosters a family-friendly environment, with cozy seating both indoors and outdoors. Enjoy complimentary Wi-Fi and outlets to charge your devices. You can even bring your furry friends and enjoy our outdoor patio dining area. Visit us for breakfast or lunch, weekdays from 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Summer Food Safety

With Memorial Day weekend nearly upon us, most of us are anticipating a fun-filled summer. Days spent outside enjoying picnics and barbecues under the warm summer sun. Despite the carefree nature of it all, food safety becomes a top priority, as cooking and eating outdoors can pose many potential risks. Because warm weather tends to speed up bacterial growth, and proper cooling and washing facilities are not as readily available outside, instances of food borne illnesses tend to increase over the summer.

To keep your risk of food poisoning low, here are some helpful food safety tips for outdoor cooking.

Planning & Packing

  • Only take the amount of food you will actually use.
  • Refrigerated foods should be packed into a cooler immediately before leaving home.
  • Non-cooler items include: whole fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, trail mix, canned meat spreads and peanut butter and jelly (once canned items are opened, store in cooler).
  • Don’t have an insulated cooler?
  • Freezing sandwiches (sans lettuce and tomatoes) beforehand.
  • Fill clean empty milk cartons or bottles with water and freeze to make ice, or freeze gel-packs.
  • Freeze any boxed drinks you may be bringing to supplement as freezer packs.

The Time Out Rule

  • Perishable food should not sit out for more than two hours. In hot weather (90°F and up), food should NEVER sit out for more than one hour.
  • Refrigerate any leftovers promptly in shallow containers.
  • Do NOT thaw frozen items outside the refrigerator or without being submerged in cold water.
  • It’s best to cook meat, poultry, etc. completely at the picnic site, rather than partially or precooking ahead of time.
  • Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold.
  • After cooking meat and poultry on the grill, keep it hot until served (140°F or warmer). Keep food hot by setting it to the side of the grill rack, not directly over the coals where they could overcook.
  • Plan to keep hot foods hot with a thermos or insulated dish.
  • Serve cold food in small portions, and keep the rest in the cooler.
  • Keep these foods cold: raw meat, poultry, and seafood, deli and luncheon meats or sandwiches, summer salads (tuna, chicken, egg, pasta, or seafood), cut up fruit and vegetables, and perishable dairy products.

Keep It Clean

  • When transporting raw meat or poultry, double wrap and place the packages in plastic bags to prevent juices from the raw product dripping on other foods. Always avoid raw meat juices touching other foods to avoid cross contamination.
  • Store food in watertight containers to prevent contact with melting ice water.
  • Always wash your hands before and after handling food.
  • If there’s no source of clean water, bring water for preparation and cleaning. Or pack clean cloths and moist towelettes for cleaning surfaces and hands.
  • Don’t forget to pack paper towels.

Keep It Cool

  • Pack foods in reverse order. First foods packed should be the last foods used.

Exception: Pack raw meat or poultry below ready-to-eat foods to prevent cross contamination (as you would in your refrigerator).

  • Keep your cooler full as it will maintain its cold temperature longer than a partially filled one.
  • Limit the times the cooler is opened. Open and close the lid quickly. Consider packing drinks in a separate cooler so the food cooler is not opened frequently.
  • For long trips take along two coolers – one for the days immediate food needs, such as lunch, drinks or snacks, and the other for perishable foods to be used later in the trip.
  • When camping or at a park, keep the cooler in a shady spot covered with a blanket, tarp or poncho (preferably one that is light in color to reflect heat). At the beach, partially bury the cooler in the sand, cover it with blankets, and shade it with a beach umbrella.
  • In a pinch, a heavy cardboard box lined with plastic bags and packed with frozen gel packs or ice will keep things cold.

Separate But Equal

  • Use separate cutting boards and utensils for raw meat and ready-to-eat items like vegetables and bread.
  • Never reuse items that touched raw meat or poultry to serve the food once it is cooked.
  • Always use a fresh, clean plate and tongs for serving cooked food.

Temperature Matters

  • Completely thaw meat, poultry and fish before grilling so it cooks more evenly.
  • Cook food to a safe minimum internal temperature to destroy harmful bacteria.
  • Use a food thermometer to be sure the food has reached a safe minimum internal temperature and clean it between uses.

Safe Minimum Internal Temperatures:

  • Whole poultry, poultry breasts, and ground poultry: 165°F
  • Ground meats: 160°F
  • Beef, pork, lamb, and veal (steaks, roasts, and chops): 145°F and allow to rest at least 3 minutes
  • Reheat any leftover food to 165°F
  • Heat hot dogs to steaming hot

At Home

  • If using a cooler, leftover perishable food is safe only if the cooler still has ice or frozen packs in it and the food didn’t sit out longer than previously mentioned.
  • Discard unsafe leftover food or immediately store food deemed safe in the refrigerator.

We hope you find these food safety tips helpful. Feel free to share your own tips with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Pinterest!

We’ve got plenty of choices to please your taste buds so come on down to the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli for your yummy sandwich fix! Join us weekdays from 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.