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Food Trends and News

Energizing Breakfast Foods

A delicious and filling breakfast can help set the tone for the day. Be sure you’re filling up on foods that will fuel you for the rest of the day. Here are some great nutritious and energizing breakfast foods.

  • Avocado
    There’s a reason avocado toast is a popular breakfast food. Loaded with heart healthy fats, B vitamins, and fiber, avocados take longer to digest, and thus, help sustain your energy throughout the day. Next time, top your avocado toast with an egg for more nutritional benefits.
  • Bananas
    Not only are they an easy option for those busy mornings, bananas offer a unique mix of antioxidants, carbohydrates, and potassium that give you an energy boost. Next time you want to reach for an energy drink, try a banana instead.
  • Breakfast Smoothie
    You can craft these to your liking and prepare them ahead of time, making them a healthy and smart option. Fruits and vegetables contains excellent nutrients that will provide you with energy through the day, and adding a source of protein will help to keep you full.
  • Eggs
    This classic and versatile breakfast food is nutrient-rich and a great source of protein. Aside from keeping you full and stabilizing your energy levels, eggs contain choline, which plays a role muscle control, and B vitamins, which convert food into energy.
  • Fresh Fruit
    Why not start your day with nature’s candy? Get your sweet tooth fix without the crash with fresh fruits. Fresh fruits contain powerful antioxidants along with fiber, which helps to keep your blood sugar levels steady.
  • Greek Yogurt
    Greek yogurt is a great source of lean protein (almost two times more than traditional yogurt), fat, and carbohydrates. The protein and fiber combination helps to delay digestion of the meal and avoid the spike and crash in blood sugar.
  • Herbal Tea
    If you can, try swapping your coffee for herbal tea. Since they have less caffeine and are water based, teas are more hydrating and contain phytochemicals and antioxidants that help protect you from free radicals.
  • Lean Meat
    Lean meats provide protein, and the amino acids in proteins help keep you alert throughout the day. Try lean meats like ham, turkey, or smoked salmon.
  • Non-Dairy Milk
    For those with dietary restrictions, non-dairy milk helps to provide vitamins and a lean source of protein sans cholesterol. Also, seek fortified versions as they will have more energy supporting nutrients than others.
  • Peanut Butter
    You may reserve peanut and other nut butters for your snacks later in the day, but adding it to breakfast can give you an extra boost. Remember, the protein and fat (and fiber when possible) combination is key to preventing highs, lows, and crashes, and will help to curb your appetite.
  • Steel-Cut Oatmeal
    Opt for steel-cut oatmeal versus the processed instant oatmeal. Your body has to work harder to break down the steel-cut oats, leaving you with more sustained energy. Also, the soluble fiber in oats helps to slow the digestion of simple carbohydrates, eliminating the spike and crash of blood sugar levels.
  • Whole Grain Bread
    Ditch the white bread – whole grain bread offers more fiber and good fats to keep you fuller longer. Whole grain bread is also fortified with B vitamins, which help with energy production in the body.

What’s your go-to breakfast when you need a little boost in the morning? Share with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Join the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli for breakfast or lunch six days a week! Breakfast is served until 10:30am and we are open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Practice Mindful Eating

Mindful eating encourages you to pay attention to what you are eating, heightening our awareness of pleasure and nourishment from our food. While the overall idea of mindful eating seems simple, to really master it takes gentle and consistent practice. Over time it can become a conscious habit, but realistically, we may fall in and out of it as staying present with eating can be a challenge in different situations.

Mindful eating often slows down the process of eating, so begin by taking a few mindful breaths to relax and become centered and present. Here are more mindful eating tips to get you started on the mindfulness path.

  • Mindful Check-In
    As mentioned, before a meal, bring awareness to your breathing. Take a breath, pause, and then notice any present thoughts or feelings, particularly in relation to the food you are about to eat. This can be brief moment or last up to a couple of minutes.

    Take a few deep, relaxing breaths and pay attention to the movement of your breaths in and out. Slowly expand your awareness to include your whole body and notice without judgment what thoughts, feelings, and body sensations are present. Consider how these may influence your choices on how much, when, and what to eat, along with desires or cravings for food.

  • Hunger & Fullness Levels
    As you are mindfully checking-in, tune in to your level of physical hunger. Most of us enjoy food most when we have some to moderate hunger – when we are too hungry, we tend to eat fast and overeat.

    Ask yourself “How hungry am I?” Listen to your body and determine whether it is physical hunger or something else. If it is the latter, ask yourself “What am I really hungry for?”

    To understand your level of physical fullness, you should also ask yourself “How full am I?” Again, listen to the messages your body is sending you. Do what would most honor your body at the present moment.

  • Reflect Upon Your Food
    How did your food get to you? What went into making it and who/what were involved (people, sun, earth, water, farmers)? Think about the quality and sources of your food, and let the sense of appreciation or gratitude for your food wash over you.
  • Senses
    Enjoy your food with all your senses:

    • Feast your eyes on your food – visually appreciate the color, texture, and shape.
    • Breathe in the aromas, and notice the nuances with both nostrils.
    • Savor your food without chewing first – notice the flavor, texture, and sensations.
    • As you chew your food, stay as present as possible with each bite and immerse yourself in the experience.
    • Mindfully swallow when ready.
      Notice any associations that arise, whether pleasant or unpleasant. Bask in pleasant associations or positive memories if you’ve like, while staying present with the full experience.
  • Taste Mindfully
    Savor the taste of your food fully, and pay attention to when the taste diminishes and your enjoyment lessens. This awareness is tool and will help you make better decisions about how much and how little to eat, as well as when to stop and when to eat more.
  • Check In With Hunger & Fullness
    Check in with hunger and fullness levels occasionally throughout the snack or meal. As you did before your meal, continue to do so throughout the meal.
  • Practice
    When you begin mindful eating, you start a slow pace as you get accustomed to the different aspects. As you hone your attention skills, your mindful eating habits will become more natural, enabling you to eat mindfully at different paces, in different settings, and with different people.

Do you practice mindful eating? What benefits have you noticed? Share with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Practice your mindful eating skills with us at the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli. We’re open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00-4:30pm. Dine in or have your food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Healthy Swaps For Sandwich Spreads

When it comes to sandwiches, the things you put on them can make or break your sandwich. Sandwich staples like mayo and mustard can be delicious, but unfortunately, fall short in the nutrition department. Here are some healthy, nutritious, and delicious sandwich spread substitutes.

  • Jam→Mashed Berries

You may think your jam is healthy, but a closer look at the label may tell another story. Ditch the excess calories, sugar, and preservatives for a fresh alternative. Using mashed berries provides more fiber and fewer calories. For instance, six large smashed strawberries offer 2 grams of fiber and only 35 calories. For a little extra sweetness, drizzle some honey on top.

  • Cheese→Roasted Garlic Spread

You don’t have to give up cheese, but if you’re using it simply to add some depth to your sandwich, you will find there are tastier and healthier ways. For example, roasted garlic is a low calorie, low sodium alternative that delivers intense flavor.

  • Cream Cheese→Cottage Cheese

Bagels and cream cheese go hand in hand, but if you’re looking for a higher protein alternative, look no further than cottage cheese. A quarter cup of low-fat cottage cheese offers 7 grams of protein and 45 calories, whereas the same serving of regular cream cheese offers four times the calories and half the protein along with saturated fat.

  • Mustard Or Mayo→Hummus

As mentioned, mustard and mayo are classic sandwich ingredients but are hardly nutritious. Avoid a dry sandwich while adding flavor and nutrition by trying a smear of hummus instead. If you don’t make it at home (where you can control the ingredients), look for brands that boast a few simple ingredients (ex. fresh chickpeas, tahini, garlic). Not only is this a tasty change, it also increases your intake of beans, plant protein, fiber, and unsaturated fat.

  • Mayo→Smashed Avocado

Smashed avocado delivers the creaminess and richness of mayo, but with less calories along with healthy fats and more than 20 different vitamins. Add lemon juice to balance the fattiness, and a little hot sauce if you enjoy a little spice.

  • Mayo→Yogurt In Tartar Sauce

Tartar sauce is a great addition to (grilled or fried) fish sandwiches. While the classic recipe is mayonnaise based, you can create a healthier version with less fat and more protein by using Greek yogurt instead. Simply substitute plain Greek yogurt and add your favorite ingredients (ex. pickles, mustard, vinegar, capers).

  • Butter→Nut Butter

Instead of melting butter on top of your toast, go for nut butter instead. Nut butters (peanut, cashew, almond) are full of healthy fats, protein, finer, and vitamins. Just remember to look for all natural nut butters without fillers – the ingredients list should be short and simple. To add more flavor and benefits, sprinkle some cinnamon on it.

Did we miss anything? Share your best healthy food swaps with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Have you tried all of our signature sandwiches? Come in today and order your favorite sandwich or try something new! Visit us in store weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm or have your food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Food Trends For The New Year

While some food trends stick, most come and go. With the start of the New Year, we are sure to see an insurgence of new food trends for us to try. Here are some food trend predictions for the New Year from dieticians.

The Keto Diet
Keto foods we introduced in 2018 and we can only expect keto-friendly products to grow into 2019. While many have adopted, or may consider, the keto diet, others find it hard to follow completely, thus, we are likely to see more modified keto diets.

Less Sugar
Sugar intake is still a major concern for many as added sugars are closely associated with diet-related chronic diseases like obesity. Manufacturers will try find ways to reduce sugar and incorporate more natural ingredients into their products, but this will continue to be a challenge as sugars play a variety of roles in processed foods aside from sweetness.

Non-Dairy Milk
Plant-based milks will continue to be a popular dairy alternative. But not all non-dairy milks are created equally. Be sure to check labels carefully to choose those that are excellent sources of calcium and vitamins D and E. And aside from popular choices like almond milk, oat milk will likely be on the rise. Compared to other alternatives, oat milk is higher in heart-healthy fiber and satiating protein.

Digital Food Shopping Carts
What happens when you combine online shopping and grocery shopping? Ultimate convenience. Online grocery shopping saves you the time of browsing aisles for your groceries and makes meals easier. You can order via computer or smart phone, browsing and clicking on the items you need. Then you can either have them prepared for pick up or get them delivered straight to your door.

Foods Cooked In Foil
We love to find ways to make cooking easier, and ‘food in a foil’ is just that. Foods cooked in foil help to enhance the infusion of flavor while making clean up a breeze. And thanks to the internet, these recipes and cooking ideas are readily available at our fingertips.

Plant-Based Eating
While not a new trend, it is continually on the rise. The different plant-based options we have available to us allows for more people to adopt a flexitarian diet. We are likely to see baked goods using cassava flour, healthier snacks such as dark chocolate-covered chickpeas, new nut butters like pumpkin seed butter, and alternative oils including pomegranate seed oil and algae oil.

What food trend predictions do you have? What are you most excited to try this year? Share with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Start the New Year off with your favorite sandwiches and salads at the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli! We are open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm for breakfast and lunch. You can also get our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Warm Salads For Cold Weather

Winter is almost here, which means colder weather and cravings for warming comfort food. While salads may not come to mind when you think of winter comfort foods, warm salads may change your mind. The contrasting of temperatures, textures, and flavors just might make warm salads you new winter comfort food of choice. Here’s how you can build the perfect warm salad.

  • Base

While lettuces are the most common greens associated with salads, they are not the only ones available. For your warm salad, choose leafy greens that can be slightly cooked or steamed. You can add these warm greens to your favorite fresh salad greens or use them as a base alone. Mix and match until you find your favorite blend.

Some great choices for a warm base are kale (any variety), collard greens, Swiss chard, cabbage, arugula, dandelion greens, spinach.

  • Toppings

Toppings help bring salads to life, and with warm salads, there’s a limitless variety available. You can add your favorite toppings to create a salad that suits your tastes, preferences, and resources. For example, you can use last night’s leftover roasted vegetables or caramelized onions to add depth. If you go with leftovers, you may want to mix in fresh veggies as well to balance both the crunchy and soft textures.

Warm or Cold Toppings:

  • Cruciferous Vegetables (turnips, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage)
  • Vegetables (green onions, cucumbers, radishes, bell peppers, peas, asparagus, zucchini, squash, tomatoes)
  • Fruits (mandarin oranges, figs, dried fruits – cranberries, raisins, blueberries)
  • Seeds (sunflower, pumpkin, flax) and Nuts (walnuts, pecans, cashews, peanuts, or brazil nuts)
  • Carbohydrate/Starch

Whether warm or cold, if you’re eating a salad for a meal, adding a complex carbohydrate or starch to it will help sustain your energy. Warm salads are great for potatoes, whole grains, beans, legumes, or another type of starch.

Some healthy choices include freekeh, wheatberries, quinoa, rice, faro, millet, barley, sweet potato, beans or lentils.

  • Plant Protein

A serving of protein helps to nutritionally balance your salad. There are even some plant options that double as a protein and a complex carbohydrate, like quinoa or beans.

Consider these quality protein choices: tofu (you can make your own or buy it premade), tempeh, beans or lentils, edamame, green peas, quinoa, wheatberries

  • Add Flair

A great way to enjoy healthy food more is to add flair to keep it interesting. Adding a small amount of tasty food will help to keep your taste buds happy.

Try topping salads with roasted nuts or spiced seeds (avoid those made with extra oils). Or try crumbled toasted pita chips, warmed capers or olives, or even sundried tomatoes on your salad. Warm salads are so versatile that, again, the possibilities are endless.

  • Dressing

A delicious dressing or sauce can take salads to the next level. They are also a great way to incorporate healthy fats into the meal. To keep it healthier, choose dressings made from whole foods, such as tahini, avocado, or cashews.

Warm salads: love them or hate them? Share your thoughts and tips with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Visit the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. Dine in, order to-go, or have our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Vegan Facts & Fiction

Did you know November is World Vegan Month? If you’ve ever thought about becoming vegan, or at least eating less meat and more plant-based foods, there are some important things you need to know before you dive in. These are some common misconceptions about the vegan diet.

X MYTH: Vegans don’t get enough protein.
In actuality, we all pretty much get enough protein. It’s not one of the nutrients we really need to worry about since we have so many sources for it. And a proper vegan diet incorporates plant proteins from sources such as nuts, beans, soy foods, and quinoa. Even athletes, who have particular protein needs, can meet their protein requirement by choosing a variety of plant protein sources.

And although most plant proteins are considered “incomplete” proteins (they don’t have all nine essential amino acids that animal proteins do), as long as you eat a variety of protein sources on a given day, you should be covered.

  • FACT: Vegans never eat meat, fish, dairy, or eggs.
    Strict vegans only eat food from plants. Vegetarians may eat dairy and eggs, vegans don’t eat any animal by-products, including honey. While the reasons may vary (animal welfare concerns, environmental reasons, health/weight loss, wellness beliefs), vegans only consume foods and products made from plants.

X MYTH: Going vegan always leads to weight loss.
Vegan diets may prompt weight loss, but it is not guaranteed. You should still pay attention to the nutritional value of the vegan foods you consume. For example, Oreos and French fries are vegan-friendly, but may not be helpful when it comes to weight loss. You should focus on consuming fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans for an increased fiber intake, which can help you lose weight over time.

  • FACT: You need to supplement a vegan diet.
    Vitamin B12 (critical in cell division and the maintenance of nerve cells) is only found in animal products and not plant foods, which means vegans are susceptible to a deficiency. Vegans should supplement with vitamin B12 pill or fortified cereal. But when it comes to fortified cereal, it is important to read to label to be sure vitamin B12 is covered.

Vegans at risk for falling short on other nutrients (calcium, iron, omega-3 fatty acids) should meet with a registered dietician who can either suggest how to meet your needs with foods or recommend a quality vegan supplement.

X MYTH: Meat alternatives are healthier than meat.
Unfortunately, many meat alternatives contain lots of sodium, which can increase blood pressure. Ideally, we should be consuming no more than 1500mg of sodium per day (as recommended by the American Heart Association). However, some frozen veggie burgers can contain up to 600mg of sodium per burger. Even more concerning, not all meat impersonators are vegan so be sure to read the fine print.

Vegan or not, we should be choosing whole foods over hyper-processed ones. Vegans should focus on animal-free whole food staples (beans, nuts, whole grains, fruits & veggies) for a nutritious and balanced diet.

Overall Benefits
Aside from the environmental and animal welfare benefits, there are also great health benefits associated with a vegan diet. Studies show that these diets can lower the risk of cancer, most likely due to an increased consumption of antioxidant- and fiber-rich foods (fruits, veggies, whole grains, legumes).

Food can be healing as well, and the foods included in a vegan diet are associated with improved blood pressure, reductions in heart disease, and a lower chance of developing type 2 diabetes.

Not ready to jump in? You can benefit from a more flexible approach. Make it a point to consume less meat and more plant-based foods by adjusting your diet. For example, you can designate a day or two during the week in which you consume vegan friendly meals and snacks.

Have you tried to go vegan? Share your stories with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Did you know our vegetarian sandwiches can be made vegan? Simply let our staff know and we will gladly prepare a vegan friendly meal for you! Visit us weekdays from 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Best Sandwiches Across America

Whether you are a sandwich connoisseur or simply a sandwich lover (like us), these are some of the most popular sandwiches from different regions across America.

South

  • St. Louis Gerber Sandwich
    This is an open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich, made with crusty French bread smeared with garlic butter and toasted.
  • Pimento Cheese Sandwich
    This Southern picnic staple is made with cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, plus crispy fried green tomatoes between grilled bread.
  • Shrimp Po’Boy
    A New Orleans classic features fried shrimp drenched in spicy remoulade sauce on a buttered bun.
  • Kentucky Hot Brown Sandwich
    This sandwich gets its name from Louisville’s Brown Hotel, where it was first served.  Another open-faced sandwich layered with turkey, bacon, tomatoes, and cheese sauce, and then broiled.
  • Muffaletta Sandwich
    Another favorite from New Orleans. Italian charcuterie and olive salad spread are sandwiched between round Sicilian sesame bread of the same name.

Northeast

  • Spiedie Sandwich
    Hailing from Binghampton, New York, this sandwich features marinated meat (chicken, pork, lamb, veal, venison, or beef) grilled on spits and served on soft Italian bread.
  • Beef On Weck
    Another New York classic, the Beef on Weck is made with rare, thin-cut beef and horseradish served on a kummelweck roll and topped with salt and caraway seeds.
  • Lobster Roll
    There is debate whether the best lobster rolls are found in Maine or Connecticut. Depending on your preference, you can have either  mayo or butter with your Maine lobster, served on New England-style rolls which are split on top rather than on the side.

Midwest

  • Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich
    Popular in Indiana, this sandwich contains pork tenderloin pounded thin and coated in batter then fried. The batter gets its extra crunch from crushed Saltines and panko crumbs.
  • Chicago-Style Italian Beef Sandwich
    Slow-cooked shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, plus mozzarella cheese on Italian bread make this Chicago favorite.
  • Reuben Sandwich
    There is uncertainty about whether this sandwich originated in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but the standard recipe remains – delicious corned beef and Thousand Island dressing sandwiched between two slices of rye bread.

West

  • Denver Omelet Sandwich
    The Denver Omelet Sandwich, or the Western Sandwich,  is quite simple. First, the Denver omelet is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms,  and bell peppers. Then the omelet is placed between two buttered slices of bread.
  • BLTA
    California’s love for avocados is no secret, so why not add it to the BLT? Made with bacon, lettuce, tomato, and avocado, the BLTA takes the classic sandwich a step further by adding a new flavor and texture to the mix.
  • French Dip Sandwich
    Born in Los Angeles (although two restaurants claim to have invented it), the French Dip is made with sliced roast beef topped with cheese and served with a side of hot au jus dip.

How many of these popular regional sandwiches have you tried? Of them all, which do you prefer? Share your favorites with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Have you tried all of our signature sandwiches? Come in today and order your favorite sandwich or try something new! Visit us in store on the corner of Arrow Hwy and Garey Ave in Pomona, or have your food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Popular Trends In Catering

From weddings to business conferences to special events, catering services are getting creative and going above and beyond. Let’s take a look at some of the currently popular catering food trends.

Experiential Catering
Consumer demand for knowing more about food and where it comes from continues to grow. We see more awareness, education and consciousness when it comes to what people are consuming, and thus, transparency is key.

With that said, experiential catering allows guests to be part of the cooking process with an interactive catering station. For example, a pasta station provides guests the experience of watching the chef’s entire process of making the pasta from scratch, cooking, and serving it. Another example is a pizza station that allows guests to choose their own toppings and watch the pizza come to fruition in a hot woodfire oven. Lastly, a slider station is another way to incorporate guests in the experience. They can use their imagination and create their own sliders, choosing their protein, toppings and sauces.

Healthy Options
The health-conscious lifestyle has gained momentum over the last few years, with many looking for healthy versions of classics and interesting, new superfoods. Luckily, these healthy foods are great for both presentation and taste. Things like poke bowls, smoothie bowls, edible flowers, fermented foods, plant-based soups and superfood slaws deliver great flavors, textures, and colors. With their excellent ingredients, they promise slow-release energy and quality brain fuel.

Instagrammable Items
Presentation is key. Incorporating Instagram-worthy elements to your catering will definitely wow your guests and potentially get them talking on social media. And positive word of mouth can go a very long way. Instagram loves unique and pretty things like charcoal-infused ice cream or hanging macaroons.

Root-To-Stem Eating
Much like nose-to-tail butchery, root-to-stem cooking aims to cut down on food waste. It makes use of the entire vegetable, resulting in things like pickled watermelon rinds, carrot top pesto, fennel frond vinaigrette, and sautéed beet greens. By rethinking the parts you normally toss, you cut down on food waste and save money in the long run.

Chaga Mushrooms
Although it’s been around for years, chaga mushrooms have only recently been discovered as an amazing superfood. This is thanks to its incredible immune system benefits and for retaining balance. Aside from these health benefits, they deliver delicious flavor. They are being used in dishes such as mushroom canapés, wild mushrooms with balsamic and thyme, grilled cheese and minty mushrooms, and even chaga mushroom tarts.

Grazing Tables
A table filled with rustic bread, local cheeses and a variety of meats and dips allows guests to graze and mingle over the food. Keep in mind that a divers and colorful arrangement will have a greater impact. Also, don’t skimp on the good stuff – while presentation is important, good quality food always prevails. And of course, you want to consider texture as well. Combine soft and hard cheeses, smooth and coarse crackers, crunchy and melt-in-your-mouth snacks, along with passionfruit, figs and edible flowers for the ultimate spread.

Food Walls
This concept plays with the presentation of classic and comfort foods (think donut or pretzel walls). When your favorites are presented in an unfamiliar way, it is exciting and interactive, which draws guests in.

Veggie-based Cocktails
Veggies are no longer just garnishes for your drinks. More craft cocktails will be vegetable-infused with veggies such as beets, carrots, butternut squash, radish, tomatillos, and more. Some great examples of these veggie-infused craft cocktails that you may see include Gin & Asparagus and Tequila & Avocado.

Tacos
Everybody loves tacos. And honestly, what’s not to love? They’re easy, versatile, and delicious. You can fill them with whatever you like – veggies, rice, chili beans, salads, garnishes – the possibilities are endless. And because of this, they will remain a catering food staple.

Korean Food
Whether traditional or a fusion style, Korean food is a popular cuisine. Things like kimchi, soft tofu stew, soy sauce crab, japchae, and Korean fried or sweet crispy chicken are loved by many. An easy dish that’s great for catering is bibimbap, which is like a rice bowl typically served with mixed veggies, beef, egg, sesame oil, and chili paste.

Brunch
The lazy weekend meal is no longer just that. The brunch trend is growing, especially for wedding catering – think a brunch bar with Bloody Marys and mimosas. You also want to be adventurous with the selection by adding unconventional flavors to classic dishes. For example, you can try coconut pancakes with banana and crème fraiche, Bloody Mary baked beans, dukkah-rolled eggs with freekeh and beetroot, or chocolate muesli with warm milk.

What other catering trends have you seen and loved? Share your favorites with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

To learn more about the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli’s catering services, call 909-596-5225, visit BrickMarketDeli.com, or stop by to speak with our staff. We are located on the northeast corner of Garey Avenue and East Arrow Highway in Pomona.

Around The World In Sandwiches

In honor of National Sandwich Month and our undying love for sandwiches, we decided to take a tour of the signature sandwiches from around the world.

Grilled Cheese // America
There’s nothing quite like a good Grilled Cheese sandwich. Sure, there are plenty of American sandwiches to choose from, but the grilled cheese is a classic.

The traditional recipes calls for sliced cheese layered between two slices of white bread smeared with butter on either side. The sandwich is then grilled until the bread is crisp and the cheese is gooey. However, you can find a multitude of variations on this, for example, our 3-Cheese Grilled Cheese Sandwich.

Smørrebrød // Denmark
The translation of smørrebrød is simply “buttered bread,” but there’s more than that to this Scandinavian sandwich. It starts with a very dense and thick slice of rye bread that is slathered with butter, sour cream, or some sort of horseradish schmear. Traditionally, toppings include pickled or smoked fish, liver pate, sliced cold cuts, and boiled eggs, but this open faced sandwich can be topped with whatever your heart desires.

The different texture and flavor combinations are endless and reason enough to try this unconventional sandwich.

Falafel // Egypt
Falafel is made of ground chickpeas, finely chopped onions, fresh herbs, and Middle Eastern spices mixed together then shaped into 1.5 inch balls. These are then deep fried until golden. The falafel balls are stuffed into warm pita and served with different fillings, such as shepherd’s salad (cucumber, tomato, and green peppers) and brightly colored pickles, such as hot pink turnips, green cucumbers, and deep red beets. You may also find a delicious spread of hummus, baba ganoush, white sauce (yogurt or tahini based), or spicy harissa pepper sauce.

Tramezzini // Italy
Tramezzini are iconic Italian finger sandwiches, which are very similar to English tea sandwiches. These small triangular sandwiches are made with crust-less, soft white bread and homemade mayonnaise. You can purchase and enjoy these between breakfast and lunch at many restaurants and bars in Venice, Italy.

Though the filling options are endless, good, homemade mayonnaise and soft, crust-less white bread are essential.

Croque Monsieur // France
The Croque Monsieur contains sliced ham, Dijon mustard and gruyere (or sometimes Swiss) cheese between two thick slices of buttered bread. Next, the sandwich gets fried, like a grilled cheese, and covered with a rich and creamy béchamel sauce. Lastly, the entire sandwich with sauce goes under the broiler until the top is crispy. Top this with a fried or poached egg and you get a Croque Madame.

Cemita // Mexico
The Cemita comes from the Puebla region of Mexico and these sandwiches are typically stuffed with a variety of fried meats, avocado, queso, chipotles and red sauce. So what is the difference between a cemita and a torta? While the recipes are similar and versatile, they differ in their city of origin. Regardless of which one you order, you are sure to enjoy a great blend of flavors and textures.

Cucumber Tea Sandwich // England
Again, there were many sandwich options to choose from, including the chip butty, the Ploughman’s Lunch, and the Christmas Leftover sandwich. However, the English Tea sandwich reigns supreme as the traditional staple of the United Kingdom. And much like the tramezzini, there are endless varieties, but the most classic has to be the cucumber, cream cheese, and white bread tea sandwich.

Gyro // Greece
In Greece, street vendors can be seen shaving meat off of vertical grills and stuffing them into fresh pitas filled with tzatziki, French fries, and fresh vegetables. And there, gyros are more commonly filled with chicken or pork, rather than shaved lamb like we are accustomed to in America.

Choripan // Argentina
If you guessed that choripan is made with grilled chorizo and crusty bread, you are correct. A combination of beef and pork ground together in a sausage-like form  is then split down the middle and griddled until crispy. That is then placed on some crusty bread and topped with chimichurri sauce and fresh salsa. Sometimes you may see it served with fried shoestring potatoes.

Arepa // Colombia
This popular Colombian food is eaten daily. Although arepas are often prepared for immediate consumption and the recipe calls for fresh, handmade dough, you can find pre-prepared arepas at grocery stores in the U.S. and South America.

Much like the other sandwiches on this list, and sandwiches in general, filling options are endless. A common and beloved favorite includes a sweet corn arepa stuffed with black beans, plantains, crumbled queso fresco cheese and avocado.

Steamed Buns // China
These Taiwanese mouth-shaped buns are also known as gua bao, and are gaining traction thanks to Chef David Chang of Momofuku. If you haven’t already, you will see more steamed buns dishes being added to different menus.

Typically, a light and fluffy steamed bun is filled with meats, pickles, fresh herbs, crushed peanuts, and hot sauce. But again, there are numerous filling variations, such as BBQ pork belly with pickles to deep fried tofu with crushed peanuts and everything in between.

Medianoche // Cuba
Nearly identical to the Cuban sandwich found here, the Medianoche contains roasted pork, Swiss cheese, mustard and dill pickles, but on a pressed, sweet, yolky bread similar to challah. The bread is the distinctive factor so be sure to skip the Cuban bread and find the sweet Medianoche bread at most Latin American grocery stores.

Bánh Mì // Vietnam
The bánh mì is made with a Vietnamese baguette (similar to a French baguette) stuffed with some kind of grilled meat (ex. pork belly), pate, pickled carrots and daikon, jalapeños, cucumbers, French mayonnaise, Sriracha, fresh cilantro, and fresh mint. Talk about a mouthful of flavor!

Doner Kebab // Turkey
This Turkish delight is served a as street food around Eastern Europe. Similar to a gyro, seasoned meat is skewered onto a spear and them slow roasted on a vertical flame. The meat is then shaved off with an electric razor, and drops down to a griddle to crisp up. The meat, fresh vegetables and a variety of sauces are then stuffed into a warm piece of lavash flat bread and, as the finishing touch, the whole thing is grilled.

Smoked Meat Sandwich // Canada
Imagine a combination of pastrami and corned beef and you can get a general idea of Canada’s smoked meat sandwich.

For the Montreal Smoked Meat Sandwich, Kosher brisket is brined and corned for over a week, then gets hot-smoked and steamed until it melts in your mouth. The meat is stacked high (around 4-5 inches) between two slices of soft rye seedless bread with a smear of yellow mustard.

Fun Fact: The little bits of meat left after slicing the brisket are saved and used for other delicious Montreal specialties such as poutine.

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At the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli, we serve a variety of signature sandwiches made to order. Add one of our craft sodas, a deli salad or chips, and one of our baked goods to round out your meal. Explore our menu online or visit us in store weekdays from 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays from 8:00am-4:30pm.

Did You Know? Hot Dog Fun Facts

Did you know that July is National Hot Dog Month? We won’t get into the hot dog/sandwich debate, but we will share some fun facts about the beloved summer staple.

  • Hot Dog Origins

Hot dogs are essentially a modern-day twist on the humble sausage. Did you know sausages were mention in Homer’s The Odyssey? And Emperor Nero’s chef, Gaius, is said to have prepared sausages for his ruler. Still, no one knows who got the idea to put it on a bun centuries later. While we cannot pinpoint who “invented” the popular food, most agree that they likely originated in Vienna, Austria or Frankfurt, Germany.

According to the Austrian city of Vienna, two Austro-Hungarian immigrants, Emil Reichel and Sam Ladany, are the hot dog inventors. When the two men left Europe for Chicago, they took the recipe with them, and sold hot dogs at the 1893 World’s Fair. Later, Reichel and Ladany founded a famous beef production company that’s still producing hot dogs today.

Meanwhile, officials in Frankfurt, Germany, say that hot dogs were invented in their city in 1487. And according to a third tale, a butcher named Johann Georghehner, who lived in Coburg, Germany, invented the hot dog during the late 1600s, and traveled to Frankfurt to promote his new food.

  • There’s A “Right” and “Wrong” Way To Eat Hot Dogs

According to one American meat trade association’s official etiquette guide for hot dog-eating (you read that right), it’s “tacky” to top your hot dog with ketchup if you’re over 18 years old, and “pretentious” to consume it with utensils.

Other don’ts  include placing the dog on a fancy bun (think sun-dried tomato or basil) and serving it on anything fancier than a paper plate or everyday dishes. Do’s include eating every part of the hot dog, including the leftover bun bits, pairing it with simple drinks and sides, and always licking off any condiments that get on your fingers.

  • Mustard Is The Most Popular Hot Dog Topping

According to a survey in 2014, 71% of Americans said they liked to garnish their hot dogs with mustard. However, an overwhelming 52% of respondents said they preferred to smother their dogs with ketchup (despite the aforementioned etiquette).

  • Hot Dogs Have Been To Space

Astronauts may have disliked the freeze-dried ice cream they were served, but both astronauts and crewmembers did enjoy hot dogs very much.

  • Americans Eat (And Buy) A Lot Of Hot Dogs

Did you eat a hot dog (or two) on Independence Day this year? You may have contributed to the 150 million hot dogs consumed on the Fourth of July. In addition, between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Americans will eat 7 billion hot dogs. And in 2015, U.S. supermarket customers spent more than $2.5 billion on hot dogs.

  • A Hot Dog Once Sold For $169

This happened in 2014 in Seattle, Washington. The decadent dog consisted of a cheese bratwurst topped with butter Teriyaki grilled onions, Maitake mushrooms, wagyu beef, foie gras, shaved black truffles, caviar, and Japanese mayonnaise on a brioche bun.

  • A Competitive Eater Consumed 62 Hot Dogs In 10 Minutes

This record-breaking feat was accomplished in 2015.

Did we miss anything? Share your fun facts with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

We don’t have hot dogs, but we do have a variety of yummy sandwiches and salads for you to choose from. Explore our menu online at BrickMarketDeli.com. Visit us in store, order online, or have our delicious food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS!