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Food Trends and News

Warm Salads For Cold Weather

Winter is almost here, which means colder weather and cravings for warming comfort food. While salads may not come to mind when you think of winter comfort foods, warm salads may change your mind. The contrasting of temperatures, textures, and flavors just might make warm salads you new winter comfort food of choice. Here’s how you can build the perfect warm salad.

  • Base

While lettuces are the most common greens associated with salads, they are not the only ones available. For your warm salad, choose leafy greens that can be slightly cooked or steamed. You can add these warm greens to your favorite fresh salad greens or use them as a base alone. Mix and match until you find your favorite blend.

Some great choices for a warm base are kale (any variety), collard greens, Swiss chard, cabbage, arugula, dandelion greens, spinach.

  • Toppings

Toppings help bring salads to life, and with warm salads, there’s a limitless variety available. You can add your favorite toppings to create a salad that suits your tastes, preferences, and resources. For example, you can use last night’s leftover roasted vegetables or caramelized onions to add depth. If you go with leftovers, you may want to mix in fresh veggies as well to balance both the crunchy and soft textures.

Warm or Cold Toppings:

  • Cruciferous Vegetables (turnips, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage)
  • Vegetables (green onions, cucumbers, radishes, bell peppers, peas, asparagus, zucchini, squash, tomatoes)
  • Fruits (mandarin oranges, figs, dried fruits – cranberries, raisins, blueberries)
  • Seeds (sunflower, pumpkin, flax) and Nuts (walnuts, pecans, cashews, peanuts, or brazil nuts)
  • Carbohydrate/Starch

Whether warm or cold, if you’re eating a salad for a meal, adding a complex carbohydrate or starch to it will help sustain your energy. Warm salads are great for potatoes, whole grains, beans, legumes, or another type of starch.

Some healthy choices include freekeh, wheatberries, quinoa, rice, faro, millet, barley, sweet potato, beans or lentils.

  • Plant Protein

A serving of protein helps to nutritionally balance your salad. There are even some plant options that double as a protein and a complex carbohydrate, like quinoa or beans.

Consider these quality protein choices: tofu (you can make your own or buy it premade), tempeh, beans or lentils, edamame, green peas, quinoa, wheatberries

  • Add Flair

A great way to enjoy healthy food more is to add flair to keep it interesting. Adding a small amount of tasty food will help to keep your taste buds happy.

Try topping salads with roasted nuts or spiced seeds (avoid those made with extra oils). Or try crumbled toasted pita chips, warmed capers or olives, or even sundried tomatoes on your salad. Warm salads are so versatile that, again, the possibilities are endless.

  • Dressing

A delicious dressing or sauce can take salads to the next level. They are also a great way to incorporate healthy fats into the meal. To keep it healthier, choose dressings made from whole foods, such as tahini, avocado, or cashews.

Warm salads: love them or hate them? Share your thoughts and tips with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Visit the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. Dine in, order to-go, or have our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Vegan Facts & Fiction

Did you know November is World Vegan Month? If you’ve ever thought about becoming vegan, or at least eating less meat and more plant-based foods, there are some important things you need to know before you dive in. These are some common misconceptions about the vegan diet.

X MYTH: Vegans don’t get enough protein.
In actuality, we all pretty much get enough protein. It’s not one of the nutrients we really need to worry about since we have so many sources for it. And a proper vegan diet incorporates plant proteins from sources such as nuts, beans, soy foods, and quinoa. Even athletes, who have particular protein needs, can meet their protein requirement by choosing a variety of plant protein sources.

And although most plant proteins are considered “incomplete” proteins (they don’t have all nine essential amino acids that animal proteins do), as long as you eat a variety of protein sources on a given day, you should be covered.

  • FACT: Vegans never eat meat, fish, dairy, or eggs.
    Strict vegans only eat food from plants. Vegetarians may eat dairy and eggs, vegans don’t eat any animal by-products, including honey. While the reasons may vary (animal welfare concerns, environmental reasons, health/weight loss, wellness beliefs), vegans only consume foods and products made from plants.

X MYTH: Going vegan always leads to weight loss.
Vegan diets may prompt weight loss, but it is not guaranteed. You should still pay attention to the nutritional value of the vegan foods you consume. For example, Oreos and French fries are vegan-friendly, but may not be helpful when it comes to weight loss. You should focus on consuming fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans for an increased fiber intake, which can help you lose weight over time.

  • FACT: You need to supplement a vegan diet.
    Vitamin B12 (critical in cell division and the maintenance of nerve cells) is only found in animal products and not plant foods, which means vegans are susceptible to a deficiency. Vegans should supplement with vitamin B12 pill or fortified cereal. But when it comes to fortified cereal, it is important to read to label to be sure vitamin B12 is covered.

Vegans at risk for falling short on other nutrients (calcium, iron, omega-3 fatty acids) should meet with a registered dietician who can either suggest how to meet your needs with foods or recommend a quality vegan supplement.

X MYTH: Meat alternatives are healthier than meat.
Unfortunately, many meat alternatives contain lots of sodium, which can increase blood pressure. Ideally, we should be consuming no more than 1500mg of sodium per day (as recommended by the American Heart Association). However, some frozen veggie burgers can contain up to 600mg of sodium per burger. Even more concerning, not all meat impersonators are vegan so be sure to read the fine print.

Vegan or not, we should be choosing whole foods over hyper-processed ones. Vegans should focus on animal-free whole food staples (beans, nuts, whole grains, fruits & veggies) for a nutritious and balanced diet.

Overall Benefits
Aside from the environmental and animal welfare benefits, there are also great health benefits associated with a vegan diet. Studies show that these diets can lower the risk of cancer, most likely due to an increased consumption of antioxidant- and fiber-rich foods (fruits, veggies, whole grains, legumes).

Food can be healing as well, and the foods included in a vegan diet are associated with improved blood pressure, reductions in heart disease, and a lower chance of developing type 2 diabetes.

Not ready to jump in? You can benefit from a more flexible approach. Make it a point to consume less meat and more plant-based foods by adjusting your diet. For example, you can designate a day or two during the week in which you consume vegan friendly meals and snacks.

Have you tried to go vegan? Share your stories with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Did you know our vegetarian sandwiches can be made vegan? Simply let our staff know and we will gladly prepare a vegan friendly meal for you! Visit us weekdays from 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Best Sandwiches Across America

Whether you are a sandwich connoisseur or simply a sandwich lover (like us), these are some of the most popular sandwiches from different regions across America.

South

  • St. Louis Gerber Sandwich
    This is an open-faced ham and provolone cheese sandwich, made with crusty French bread smeared with garlic butter and toasted.
  • Pimento Cheese Sandwich
    This Southern picnic staple is made with cheddar cheese and chipotle peppers, plus crispy fried green tomatoes between grilled bread.
  • Shrimp Po’Boy
    A New Orleans classic features fried shrimp drenched in spicy remoulade sauce on a buttered bun.
  • Kentucky Hot Brown Sandwich
    This sandwich gets its name from Louisville’s Brown Hotel, where it was first served.  Another open-faced sandwich layered with turkey, bacon, tomatoes, and cheese sauce, and then broiled.
  • Muffaletta Sandwich
    Another favorite from New Orleans. Italian charcuterie and olive salad spread are sandwiched between round Sicilian sesame bread of the same name.

Northeast

  • Spiedie Sandwich
    Hailing from Binghampton, New York, this sandwich features marinated meat (chicken, pork, lamb, veal, venison, or beef) grilled on spits and served on soft Italian bread.
  • Beef On Weck
    Another New York classic, the Beef on Weck is made with rare, thin-cut beef and horseradish served on a kummelweck roll and topped with salt and caraway seeds.
  • Lobster Roll
    There is debate whether the best lobster rolls are found in Maine or Connecticut. Depending on your preference, you can have either  mayo or butter with your Maine lobster, served on New England-style rolls which are split on top rather than on the side.

Midwest

  • Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich
    Popular in Indiana, this sandwich contains pork tenderloin pounded thin and coated in batter then fried. The batter gets its extra crunch from crushed Saltines and panko crumbs.
  • Chicago-Style Italian Beef Sandwich
    Slow-cooked shredded beef, giardiniera and red peppers, plus mozzarella cheese on Italian bread make this Chicago favorite.
  • Reuben Sandwich
    There is uncertainty about whether this sandwich originated in Omaha, Nebraska or New York City, but the standard recipe remains – delicious corned beef and Thousand Island dressing sandwiched between two slices of rye bread.

West

  • Denver Omelet Sandwich
    The Denver Omelet Sandwich, or the Western Sandwich,  is quite simple. First, the Denver omelet is made with freshly beaten eggs, diced ham, mushrooms,  and bell peppers. Then the omelet is placed between two buttered slices of bread.
  • BLTA
    California’s love for avocados is no secret, so why not add it to the BLT? Made with bacon, lettuce, tomato, and avocado, the BLTA takes the classic sandwich a step further by adding a new flavor and texture to the mix.
  • French Dip Sandwich
    Born in Los Angeles (although two restaurants claim to have invented it), the French Dip is made with sliced roast beef topped with cheese and served with a side of hot au jus dip.

How many of these popular regional sandwiches have you tried? Of them all, which do you prefer? Share your favorites with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Have you tried all of our signature sandwiches? Come in today and order your favorite sandwich or try something new! Visit us in store on the corner of Arrow Hwy and Garey Ave in Pomona, or have your food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Popular Trends In Catering

From weddings to business conferences to special events, catering services are getting creative and going above and beyond. Let’s take a look at some of the currently popular catering food trends.

Experiential Catering
Consumer demand for knowing more about food and where it comes from continues to grow. We see more awareness, education and consciousness when it comes to what people are consuming, and thus, transparency is key.

With that said, experiential catering allows guests to be part of the cooking process with an interactive catering station. For example, a pasta station provides guests the experience of watching the chef’s entire process of making the pasta from scratch, cooking, and serving it. Another example is a pizza station that allows guests to choose their own toppings and watch the pizza come to fruition in a hot woodfire oven. Lastly, a slider station is another way to incorporate guests in the experience. They can use their imagination and create their own sliders, choosing their protein, toppings and sauces.

Healthy Options
The health-conscious lifestyle has gained momentum over the last few years, with many looking for healthy versions of classics and interesting, new superfoods. Luckily, these healthy foods are great for both presentation and taste. Things like poke bowls, smoothie bowls, edible flowers, fermented foods, plant-based soups and superfood slaws deliver great flavors, textures, and colors. With their excellent ingredients, they promise slow-release energy and quality brain fuel.

Instagrammable Items
Presentation is key. Incorporating Instagram-worthy elements to your catering will definitely wow your guests and potentially get them talking on social media. And positive word of mouth can go a very long way. Instagram loves unique and pretty things like charcoal-infused ice cream or hanging macaroons.

Root-To-Stem Eating
Much like nose-to-tail butchery, root-to-stem cooking aims to cut down on food waste. It makes use of the entire vegetable, resulting in things like pickled watermelon rinds, carrot top pesto, fennel frond vinaigrette, and sautéed beet greens. By rethinking the parts you normally toss, you cut down on food waste and save money in the long run.

Chaga Mushrooms
Although it’s been around for years, chaga mushrooms have only recently been discovered as an amazing superfood. This is thanks to its incredible immune system benefits and for retaining balance. Aside from these health benefits, they deliver delicious flavor. They are being used in dishes such as mushroom canapés, wild mushrooms with balsamic and thyme, grilled cheese and minty mushrooms, and even chaga mushroom tarts.

Grazing Tables
A table filled with rustic bread, local cheeses and a variety of meats and dips allows guests to graze and mingle over the food. Keep in mind that a divers and colorful arrangement will have a greater impact. Also, don’t skimp on the good stuff – while presentation is important, good quality food always prevails. And of course, you want to consider texture as well. Combine soft and hard cheeses, smooth and coarse crackers, crunchy and melt-in-your-mouth snacks, along with passionfruit, figs and edible flowers for the ultimate spread.

Food Walls
This concept plays with the presentation of classic and comfort foods (think donut or pretzel walls). When your favorites are presented in an unfamiliar way, it is exciting and interactive, which draws guests in.

Veggie-based Cocktails
Veggies are no longer just garnishes for your drinks. More craft cocktails will be vegetable-infused with veggies such as beets, carrots, butternut squash, radish, tomatillos, and more. Some great examples of these veggie-infused craft cocktails that you may see include Gin & Asparagus and Tequila & Avocado.

Tacos
Everybody loves tacos. And honestly, what’s not to love? They’re easy, versatile, and delicious. You can fill them with whatever you like – veggies, rice, chili beans, salads, garnishes – the possibilities are endless. And because of this, they will remain a catering food staple.

Korean Food
Whether traditional or a fusion style, Korean food is a popular cuisine. Things like kimchi, soft tofu stew, soy sauce crab, japchae, and Korean fried or sweet crispy chicken are loved by many. An easy dish that’s great for catering is bibimbap, which is like a rice bowl typically served with mixed veggies, beef, egg, sesame oil, and chili paste.

Brunch
The lazy weekend meal is no longer just that. The brunch trend is growing, especially for wedding catering – think a brunch bar with Bloody Marys and mimosas. You also want to be adventurous with the selection by adding unconventional flavors to classic dishes. For example, you can try coconut pancakes with banana and crème fraiche, Bloody Mary baked beans, dukkah-rolled eggs with freekeh and beetroot, or chocolate muesli with warm milk.

What other catering trends have you seen and loved? Share your favorites with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

To learn more about the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli’s catering services, call 909-596-5225, visit BrickMarketDeli.com, or stop by to speak with our staff. We are located on the northeast corner of Garey Avenue and East Arrow Highway in Pomona.

Around The World In Sandwiches

In honor of National Sandwich Month and our undying love for sandwiches, we decided to take a tour of the signature sandwiches from around the world.

Grilled Cheese // America
There’s nothing quite like a good Grilled Cheese sandwich. Sure, there are plenty of American sandwiches to choose from, but the grilled cheese is a classic.

The traditional recipes calls for sliced cheese layered between two slices of white bread smeared with butter on either side. The sandwich is then grilled until the bread is crisp and the cheese is gooey. However, you can find a multitude of variations on this, for example, our 3-Cheese Grilled Cheese Sandwich.

Smørrebrød // Denmark
The translation of smørrebrød is simply “buttered bread,” but there’s more than that to this Scandinavian sandwich. It starts with a very dense and thick slice of rye bread that is slathered with butter, sour cream, or some sort of horseradish schmear. Traditionally, toppings include pickled or smoked fish, liver pate, sliced cold cuts, and boiled eggs, but this open faced sandwich can be topped with whatever your heart desires.

The different texture and flavor combinations are endless and reason enough to try this unconventional sandwich.

Falafel // Egypt
Falafel is made of ground chickpeas, finely chopped onions, fresh herbs, and Middle Eastern spices mixed together then shaped into 1.5 inch balls. These are then deep fried until golden. The falafel balls are stuffed into warm pita and served with different fillings, such as shepherd’s salad (cucumber, tomato, and green peppers) and brightly colored pickles, such as hot pink turnips, green cucumbers, and deep red beets. You may also find a delicious spread of hummus, baba ganoush, white sauce (yogurt or tahini based), or spicy harissa pepper sauce.

Tramezzini // Italy
Tramezzini are iconic Italian finger sandwiches, which are very similar to English tea sandwiches. These small triangular sandwiches are made with crust-less, soft white bread and homemade mayonnaise. You can purchase and enjoy these between breakfast and lunch at many restaurants and bars in Venice, Italy.

Though the filling options are endless, good, homemade mayonnaise and soft, crust-less white bread are essential.

Croque Monsieur // France
The Croque Monsieur contains sliced ham, Dijon mustard and gruyere (or sometimes Swiss) cheese between two thick slices of buttered bread. Next, the sandwich gets fried, like a grilled cheese, and covered with a rich and creamy béchamel sauce. Lastly, the entire sandwich with sauce goes under the broiler until the top is crispy. Top this with a fried or poached egg and you get a Croque Madame.

Cemita // Mexico
The Cemita comes from the Puebla region of Mexico and these sandwiches are typically stuffed with a variety of fried meats, avocado, queso, chipotles and red sauce. So what is the difference between a cemita and a torta? While the recipes are similar and versatile, they differ in their city of origin. Regardless of which one you order, you are sure to enjoy a great blend of flavors and textures.

Cucumber Tea Sandwich // England
Again, there were many sandwich options to choose from, including the chip butty, the Ploughman’s Lunch, and the Christmas Leftover sandwich. However, the English Tea sandwich reigns supreme as the traditional staple of the United Kingdom. And much like the tramezzini, there are endless varieties, but the most classic has to be the cucumber, cream cheese, and white bread tea sandwich.

Gyro // Greece
In Greece, street vendors can be seen shaving meat off of vertical grills and stuffing them into fresh pitas filled with tzatziki, French fries, and fresh vegetables. And there, gyros are more commonly filled with chicken or pork, rather than shaved lamb like we are accustomed to in America.

Choripan // Argentina
If you guessed that choripan is made with grilled chorizo and crusty bread, you are correct. A combination of beef and pork ground together in a sausage-like form  is then split down the middle and griddled until crispy. That is then placed on some crusty bread and topped with chimichurri sauce and fresh salsa. Sometimes you may see it served with fried shoestring potatoes.

Arepa // Colombia
This popular Colombian food is eaten daily. Although arepas are often prepared for immediate consumption and the recipe calls for fresh, handmade dough, you can find pre-prepared arepas at grocery stores in the U.S. and South America.

Much like the other sandwiches on this list, and sandwiches in general, filling options are endless. A common and beloved favorite includes a sweet corn arepa stuffed with black beans, plantains, crumbled queso fresco cheese and avocado.

Steamed Buns // China
These Taiwanese mouth-shaped buns are also known as gua bao, and are gaining traction thanks to Chef David Chang of Momofuku. If you haven’t already, you will see more steamed buns dishes being added to different menus.

Typically, a light and fluffy steamed bun is filled with meats, pickles, fresh herbs, crushed peanuts, and hot sauce. But again, there are numerous filling variations, such as BBQ pork belly with pickles to deep fried tofu with crushed peanuts and everything in between.

Medianoche // Cuba
Nearly identical to the Cuban sandwich found here, the Medianoche contains roasted pork, Swiss cheese, mustard and dill pickles, but on a pressed, sweet, yolky bread similar to challah. The bread is the distinctive factor so be sure to skip the Cuban bread and find the sweet Medianoche bread at most Latin American grocery stores.

Bánh Mì // Vietnam
The bánh mì is made with a Vietnamese baguette (similar to a French baguette) stuffed with some kind of grilled meat (ex. pork belly), pate, pickled carrots and daikon, jalapeños, cucumbers, French mayonnaise, Sriracha, fresh cilantro, and fresh mint. Talk about a mouthful of flavor!

Doner Kebab // Turkey
This Turkish delight is served a as street food around Eastern Europe. Similar to a gyro, seasoned meat is skewered onto a spear and them slow roasted on a vertical flame. The meat is then shaved off with an electric razor, and drops down to a griddle to crisp up. The meat, fresh vegetables and a variety of sauces are then stuffed into a warm piece of lavash flat bread and, as the finishing touch, the whole thing is grilled.

Smoked Meat Sandwich // Canada
Imagine a combination of pastrami and corned beef and you can get a general idea of Canada’s smoked meat sandwich.

For the Montreal Smoked Meat Sandwich, Kosher brisket is brined and corned for over a week, then gets hot-smoked and steamed until it melts in your mouth. The meat is stacked high (around 4-5 inches) between two slices of soft rye seedless bread with a smear of yellow mustard.

Fun Fact: The little bits of meat left after slicing the brisket are saved and used for other delicious Montreal specialties such as poutine.

Share your own favorite sandwiches from around the world! Connect with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

At the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli, we serve a variety of signature sandwiches made to order. Add one of our craft sodas, a deli salad or chips, and one of our baked goods to round out your meal. Explore our menu online or visit us in store weekdays from 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays from 8:00am-4:30pm.

Did You Know? Hot Dog Fun Facts

Did you know that July is National Hot Dog Month? We won’t get into the hot dog/sandwich debate, but we will share some fun facts about the beloved summer staple.

  • Hot Dog Origins

Hot dogs are essentially a modern-day twist on the humble sausage. Did you know sausages were mention in Homer’s The Odyssey? And Emperor Nero’s chef, Gaius, is said to have prepared sausages for his ruler. Still, no one knows who got the idea to put it on a bun centuries later. While we cannot pinpoint who “invented” the popular food, most agree that they likely originated in Vienna, Austria or Frankfurt, Germany.

According to the Austrian city of Vienna, two Austro-Hungarian immigrants, Emil Reichel and Sam Ladany, are the hot dog inventors. When the two men left Europe for Chicago, they took the recipe with them, and sold hot dogs at the 1893 World’s Fair. Later, Reichel and Ladany founded a famous beef production company that’s still producing hot dogs today.

Meanwhile, officials in Frankfurt, Germany, say that hot dogs were invented in their city in 1487. And according to a third tale, a butcher named Johann Georghehner, who lived in Coburg, Germany, invented the hot dog during the late 1600s, and traveled to Frankfurt to promote his new food.

  • There’s A “Right” and “Wrong” Way To Eat Hot Dogs

According to one American meat trade association’s official etiquette guide for hot dog-eating (you read that right), it’s “tacky” to top your hot dog with ketchup if you’re over 18 years old, and “pretentious” to consume it with utensils.

Other don’ts  include placing the dog on a fancy bun (think sun-dried tomato or basil) and serving it on anything fancier than a paper plate or everyday dishes. Do’s include eating every part of the hot dog, including the leftover bun bits, pairing it with simple drinks and sides, and always licking off any condiments that get on your fingers.

  • Mustard Is The Most Popular Hot Dog Topping

According to a survey in 2014, 71% of Americans said they liked to garnish their hot dogs with mustard. However, an overwhelming 52% of respondents said they preferred to smother their dogs with ketchup (despite the aforementioned etiquette).

  • Hot Dogs Have Been To Space

Astronauts may have disliked the freeze-dried ice cream they were served, but both astronauts and crewmembers did enjoy hot dogs very much.

  • Americans Eat (And Buy) A Lot Of Hot Dogs

Did you eat a hot dog (or two) on Independence Day this year? You may have contributed to the 150 million hot dogs consumed on the Fourth of July. In addition, between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Americans will eat 7 billion hot dogs. And in 2015, U.S. supermarket customers spent more than $2.5 billion on hot dogs.

  • A Hot Dog Once Sold For $169

This happened in 2014 in Seattle, Washington. The decadent dog consisted of a cheese bratwurst topped with butter Teriyaki grilled onions, Maitake mushrooms, wagyu beef, foie gras, shaved black truffles, caviar, and Japanese mayonnaise on a brioche bun.

  • A Competitive Eater Consumed 62 Hot Dogs In 10 Minutes

This record-breaking feat was accomplished in 2015.

Did we miss anything? Share your fun facts with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

We don’t have hot dogs, but we do have a variety of yummy sandwiches and salads for you to choose from. Explore our menu online at BrickMarketDeli.com. Visit us in store, order online, or have our delicious food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS!

Delicious Sandwiches From Coast To Coast

Depending on the maker, sandwiches can be very creative and delicious creations. There is also an ongoing debate about what defines a sandwich, but we won’t get into that. Instead, let’s take a look at some of the best regional sandwiches across America.

New York | Beef On Weck
“Weck” refers to the kümmelweck roll on which this sandwich is served. The German-style roll is topped with salt and caraway seeds, then loaded with thinly sliced beef, horseradish, and a half dip into au jus.

Florida | Cuban Sandwich
The origin of this sandwich is a bit ambiguous, either originating in Tampa (where it is served with salami) or Key West (sans salami), where factory workers would enjoy them for lunch in the 1800s. It then traveled to Miami via Cuban immigrant communities. It’s made up of ham, roasted pork, Swiss cheese, pickles and mustard on Cuban-style bread, which is then hot-pressed and served.

Los Angeles | French Dip
This sandwich is similar to the Beef On Weck in that it is made of thinly sliced beef on a roll and served with au jus. And like the Cuban, there is debate on who gets credit for it. Cole’s Pacific Electric Café and Philippe The Original in Downtown Los Angeles both claim ownership, with the former serving it with a side of au jus and the latter dunking the whole sandwich ahead of time.

Another regional favorite is the Italian Beef, served with shaved beef, sweet or hot peppers, Chicago-style giardiniera relish on an Italian-style roll and dipped in au jus. In addition, Baltimore’s Pit Beef sandwich contains thinly-sliced char-grilled beef and horseradish on a bun. Yes, thinly-cut beef in a sandwich is that good.

Massachusetts | Chow Mein Sandwich
If you’re not familiar with this sandwich, it probably sounds strange. This sandwich is made out of fried noodles in a brown gravy sauce with pork, chicken, or vegetables on a hamburger bun and is served in Chinese-American restaurants in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Don’t knock it ’til you try it, right?

St. Louis | The Gerber
In the early 1970s, it is believed that a Ruma’s Deli customer by the name of Dick Gerber had this made to order. Some even say that it’s not truly a Gerber unless you’re at the Ruma’s Deli. This toasted, open-faced sandwich features ham and cheese with garlic butter on crispy Italian bread. The real kicker is the processed Provel cheese (which is a hybrid of provolone, cheddar, and Swiss) that is specific to the area.

Springfield, Illinois | The Horseshoe
This is another open-face sandwich and was known as fancy hotel food back in the 1920s. It’s made with two slices of toasted bread (usually, but not always, Texas toast) topped with a thick slice of ham or two hamburger patties and fries, then covered in cheese sauce. The “Pony Shoe” is a half portion of this massive sandwich, with only one slice of bread and one hamburger patty.

Louisville, Kentucky | Hot Brown
The original 1926 Hot Brown from the Brown Hotel is an open-faced white bread sandwich with turkey and bacon smothered in Mornay sauce (a Béchamel with shredded cheese) and then broiled. Around town, some may choose to serve it with tomato or ham, or replace the Mornay with American or cheddar cheese.

Bay Area | Dutch Crunch
The Dutch Crunch is a dense, doughy bread with a moist, giraffe print crust on top that give it its signature crunch. Elsewhere it is called tiger bread because of its print. This is not tied to a specific type of sandwich, but is the basis of many different sandwiches in the area.

New Jersey | Jersey Breakfast
Served on a roll, it features pork roll (or Taylor ham) with egg and cheese. There is debate because it is so similar to the New York breakfast sandwich which consists of egg, cheese, and breakfast meat of your choice on a bagel or roll.

Chicago | Mother-In-Law
In this sandwich, you will find a tamale in a hot dog bun, which is then topped with chili. Although its origins are unclear (name and recipe), its legacy lives on for being a cheap, creative and delicious sandwich.

Pittsburgh | French Fry Sandwich
In Pittsburgh, the Primanti Brothers created what would come to be their signature sandwich for truckers that would pass through. This sandwich features Italian bread filled with meat, Italian dressing-based coleslaw, tomato slices, and French fries.

Hawaii | Musubi
Some may argue that this is not a sandwich, but it is still a notable regional snack. Musubi is made of grilled or fried Spam sandwiched between rice, sometimes with a thin piece of omelets, with furikake (a Japanese seasoning) and wrapped in nori.

Louisiana | Po’ Boy
While this sandwich has branched out from its place of origin, it still remains a staple in New Orleans, where the preferred ingredients are deep-fried shrimp and oysters with lettuce, tomato, and Tabasco in baguette-style submarine bread. You may also see these served with catfish, crab, roast, beef, or even chicken or ham elsewhere.

Southeast | Pimento Cheese Sandwich
The Pimento cheese sandwich is a Masters Tournament tradition. Pimento cheese is a sharp and spreadable orange cheese made with cheddar, mayo, red chili pepper (pimentos) and other regional ingredients. The cheese is often referred to as “the caviar of the South.” Common additions to this favorite include pickles, jalapeños, and ham.

Massachusetts | Fluffernutter
The list comes to a close with this dessert sandwich. Peanut butter and marshmallow fluff on white bread is the basic recipe, but there is room for creativity. It was reportedly created by Paul Revere’s great-great-great-granddaughter Emma Curtis, who originally called it the “Liberty Sandwich”. The name “fluffernutter” came about in the 1960s from an advertising agency. Call it what you will, it’s a deliciously sweet sandwich.

How many of these have you tried? Share your favorites with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Visit us for the best sandwiches made from the finest and freshest ingredients available. We are located at 105 E Arrow Hwy in Pomona (northeast corner of Garey Ave and E Arrow Hwy – next to Johnny’s) and are open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Catering Service Styles

When you think of catering, a buffet table set up with numerous chafing dishes may come to mind. But there is much more to catering than that. There are various catering services to choose from depending on the mood of your event, whether formal or relaxed. Review these catering service styles to determine which will work best for your next event.

Butler Passing
One of the classier styles, butler passing involves the wait staff walking around the event carrying a tray of hors d’ oeuvres or beverages for guests. It can add a touch of elegance to your event, and is often a great way to get guests ready for the main event. For example, you can use butler passing as guests wait for the wedding party to arrive for the reception dinner.

Stations
These allow your guests to get up and move around, which promotes mingling. Guests can explore the different stations and get excited for what’s next. A great theme for this type of catering service would be “around the world” where each station is set up with foods influenced by various regions.

Action Stations
These stations offer foods made to order. Think a carving station or build-your-own omelet station. Your guests get to watch the chef prepare a fresh, custom-made dish just for them. To avoid wait times, many items are partially prepped.

Self-Serve Buffets
Food dishes are commonly set up on a linear table and guests proceed down a line to pick what they want. This is a more casual approach, offering guests a wide variety of foods. The downside is the potential for running out of food before everyone has a chance to go through the line.

Portion-Controlled Buffets
To combat the aforementioned potential issue, portion-controlled buffets have attendants on hand to serve guests as they go down the buffet line. Once everyone has been served, you can open the buffet up to guests who may want more.

Plated
Plated service means each guest is served a meal individually, and is commonly encountered at weddings and formal events. The tables are often pre-set with china plates, stainless flatware, glassware and linen napkins. This catering style is labor intensive as it usually requires a waiter for every three tables, plus additional staff to pre-set tables, plate food, and to clean up. Also, ensuring that all guests are served before the food gets cold can be challenging, especially for larger groups.

Family Style
This is more relaxed in contrast to plated dinners. Guests are seated at banquet tables and food is served on large platters placed in the middle of the table by waitstaff. Guests then help themselves to the items and portions they would like. Family style dining tends to foster interaction.

Before choosing a catering service style, you want to evaluate a few things.

  • What type of mood would you like to set for the event (formal, relaxed, interactive)?
  • How long will your event last?
  • Will you provide a full meal or hors d’ oeuvres only?
  • Define your budget. Remember that some services are more labor intensive than others (ex. plated meals, action stations), and thus, more costly.

The Brick Your Neighborhood Deli offers catering, ideal for casual business or staff meetings or office lunches. To learn more about our catering, visit us in store or call 909-596-5225. For the latest news and updates, connect with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Pinterest.

Eating Healthy At Different Restaurants

When cooking at home, you are in control of what you make and the ingredients that go into it. Unfortunately, when dining out at restaurants, you can never be too sure. Despite stricter regulations on the transparency of restaurant menus and nutritional information, excess calories, fats and sodium are still sometimes hidden.

Here are some helpful tips to make healthier restaurant meal choices when you dine out.

First and foremost, know the ingredients. Before you even enter the restaurant, you may want to search for an ingredients list or basic nutrition information on their website. Looking into this beforehand can help you plan a healthier meal.

Fast Casual
Lighter options in these settings include salads, soups and sandwiches. When it comes to salads, be wary of creamy dressings (ex. ranch, Caesar, bleu cheese) and “light” dressings (sodium and sugar is often used to compensate for the reduced fat and flavor). The better choice would be oil-based dressings (ex. balsamic vinaigrette) or even a simple oil and vinegar combo. And remember to always request the dressing on the side. When it comes to soups, researching in advance can come in handy as these are often high in sodium.

Fast Food Burgers
When it comes to burgers, your best bet is to stick to the basics – bun, patty, lettuce, tomato. You also want to avoid fatty ingredients such as bacon. When it comes to condiments, instead of ketchup, barbecue sauce and honey mustard, which contain high fructose corn syrup, try yellow or Dijon mustard. And most places now allow you to skip the bun and get it wrapped in lettuce instead.

Fast Food Chicken Joint
Choosing grilled chicken instead of fried chicken can save you calories, fat, and sodium. However, what you may not know is that most of these restaurants use MSG (monosodium glutamate), which is a flavor-enhancer that may cause nausea and migraines in some people. Again, researching ahead of time would be helpful in this case.

Coffee Shop
Skip the sugary blended drinks and opt for a basic cup of brewed coffee, a shot of espresso, or an Americano. The latter are filled with antioxidants and low in calories.

Deli
Sandwiches are basically made up of bread, protein, veggies, and condiments. Better-for-you options include whole-grain bread, whole-grain or Dijon mustard, and minimally-processed protein such as chicken breast or thinly-sliced roast beef. When it comes to salads, load up on veggies and use a bit of olive oil and vinegar.

Fast Mexican
Corn tortillas are the better than flour tortillas in that the latter are higher in calories, fat, and sodium. Use cheese in moderation as the shredded options often contain preservatives and artificial ingredients. Be conscious of your sodium intake and portion sizes if you opt to flavor your food with guacamole or salsas (ex. pico de gallo, black bean & corn, tomatillo).

Casual Dining
These restaurants offer a wide variety of foods so healthy options are not the main issue. Instead, you need to be mindful of portion sizes. Keep your choices simple and pay attention to sodium.

Steakhouse
While there are nutritious options available here, unhealthy favorites are usually more tempting (ex. creamed spinach, mashed potatoes, prime rib). Choose the leanest cuts of beef (ex. sirloin, filet, New York strip) and keep it simple – avoid heavy sauces like béarnaise or peppercorn cream. For your sides, opt for steamed veggies. If they are not listed on the menu, it doesn’t hurt to ask.

How do you keep your meals healthy when you dine at restaurants? Connect with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Enjoy a healthy sandwich or salad at the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli! We’re open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. You can order online or get your favorites delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Build A Better Sandwich: Vegetarian Edition

We’ve shared tips on how to build a better sandwich, but this time we’re looking at vegetarian sandwiches. As with any other sandwich, vegetarian sandwiches require a certain craft to take them above and beyond. With that said, here are some of the best tips on crafting the perfect vegetarian sandwich.

Herbs
Why limit yourself to lettuce? Soft herbs with tender stems offer a crunchy texture along with fresh flavor. Try subbing your standard Iceberg or Bibb lettuce for fresh herbs, or use both for an interesting mix.

“Meat”
Rather than simply stuffing a salad between bread, choose a vegetable that mimics meat to add some bulk. Some good options include roasted eggplant, sweet potato, Portobello mushroom, broccolini, or lentils.

Fats
Add mayo, avocado and/or cheese to give your sandwich body and to blend flavors together. Just be mindful not to overdo it.

Presentation
Whether you like to show off your culinary creations or not, there is a universal understanding that presentation is key. Vegetarian sandwiches allow you to get incredibly creative and colorful (ex. orange sweet potatoes, hot pink beets, green herbs). Remember that a colorful sandwich is a flavorful sandwich.

Texture
Luckily, you can play with the textures of various ingredients. Have fun with crunchy and tender veggies, herbs, soft or crusty bread, and even cheese textures.

Acidity
While pickles and coleslaw are classic condiments, try thinking outside of the box. For that vinegary, acidic flavor, try pickled red onions or mustard greens (both of which can be overwhelming when served raw).

Do you get imaginative with your vegetarian sandwiches or do you have a go-to recipe? Share your favorite recipes, veggie combos, and tips with us on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Come in and try our Lentilicious Sandwich or build your own Veggie sandwich today! Dine in weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00-4:30pm or get our yummy sandwiches and salads delivered to you via DoorDash or UberEATS!