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Sandwiches

Wrapping Sandwiches

Whether you order a sandwich from the shop or make it at home, we can all agree that the technique for wrapping a sandwich can be just as important as that sandwich building itself. A poorly wrapped sandwich can result in a soggy and sad mess. To keep your sandwich’s shape and hold the ingredients in place, utilize these sandwich wrapping techniques.

Before we begin, you will need parchment paper or waxed paper and tape. You can use the precut sandwich papers, or simply cut sheets straight from the roll. And if you have a hot sandwich, or are planning to slice your sandwich in half, aluminum foil will come in handy.

Flat Sandwiches
For flat sandwiches, you want to begin with a rectangular sheet of parchment (or waxed) paper. Set the paper on the work surface in front of you vertically (a.k.a. portrait, not landscape).

Place the sandwich in the center of the paper, and, if the bread has a discernible top, bottom and sides, set it so that the top is away from you.

Next, bring the top and bottom edges of the paper together over the center of the sandwich, and line them up. Fold the edges down by half an inch, crease sharply, and then continue folding in half-inch turns and creasing sharply until the fold is flush with the surface of the sandwich. The number of folds will vary depending on the size of your sandwich and the length of the paper.

The left and right sides of the paper will then look like flattened tubes. Starting on one side, use your fingers to press the opposing edges into the center, forming a pleated triangle. Press down and crease the triangles edges, including at the base of the sandwich, and then carefully fold it underneath. Repeat these steps with the other side.

If you are wrapping a hot sandwich, you may use this same method with foil instead; however, skipping the parchment paper may make it hard to eat on the go as the foil may cling to parts of your sandwich.

Subs & Wraps
For long sandwiches, it can be tricky since the measurement of your paper will depend on the size of your sandwich.  A good rule of thumb is to cut a piece of parchment paper that’s about one and a half times the length of your sub or wrap.

Again, begin by setting the paper down in front of you vertically (like with the flat sandwich), and then place the sandwich diagonally across the paper near one of the corners.

Next, lift the corner closest to the sandwich up and over the sandwich, and then press it flush. From there, roll the sandwich in paper toward the far opposite corner, folding in the sides as you go. Once the sandwich is fully rolled with everything tucked in, use a piece of tape to secure it.

And if your sandwich is hot, you can use this technique to wrap it with foil alone or over the paper.

For additional protection, you can place these wrapped sandwiches in a sturdy container to prevent smashing. And if you have any other sandwich wrapping tips or techniques, feel free to share with us and your peers on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Join us for signature sandwiches, fresh salads, and baked goods six days a week! We’re open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm (closed Sundays). Visit us in store or have your favorites delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Sharpen Your Sandwich Skills

As National Sandwich Month rolls on, we continue celebrating by enjoying scrumptious sandwiches. If you are looking to improve your sandwich making skills, check out some of these smart sandwich hacks.

  • It’s Got To Be Serrated
    When it comes to cutting sandwiches, always use a serrated knife to avoid a smashed mess. Because a serrated knife “saws” through your sandwich, it is less likely to result in a flattened or squashed sandwich. Whether you cut your sandwiches straight down the middle or diagonally is at your discretion.
  • No Mayo? No Problem!
    Instead of reaching for the mayo, try an avocado. Simply mash the avocado and spread it on your bread like you would with mayo. Not only is it healthier, but it can add a new element of flavor to your sandwiches.
  • Sturdy Sandwich
    No one likes it when their sandwich falls apart. To prevent this, layer the heaviest ingredients first, such as your meat and cheese. Next, add the medium weight ingredients like tomatoes or avocado, and then top it off with light toppings like lettuce.
  • Wrapping Technique
    Packing a sandwich for lunch or going on a picnic? Using the proper wrapping technique will prevent your sandwich from becoming soggy or squished. Start by wrapping your sandwich in a layer of parchment paper. This breathable wrap will prevent sogginess. Next, put the wrapped sandwich in a sturdy food container to keep it from getting squashed.
  • PB&J Time
    If you’re making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, to eat not or a little later, try spreading peanut butter on both pieces of bread (feel free to use as much or as little as you please). The peanut butter on both slices will prevent the jelly from bleeding through the bread.
  • Tastier Tomatoes
    After slicing your tomatoes, place the slices on a paper towel before putting them in your sandwich. This will prevent sogginess and gives you a chance to season your tomatoes beforehand.
  • Bread Variety
    If you want to switch up your sandwich routine, you can try changing the bread. Pita pockets, bagels or English muffins are great substitutes.
  • Cover It Up
    If you are using round meat slices, there’s a trick to maximizing your bread coverage. For the round meat slices into quarters and place them in each corner of the bread. Then continue adding until your bread is covered.
  • Prep It Good
    Assemble the interior of the sandwich by layering condiments in between slices of meat and cheese. Put each sandwich interior into a ziplock bag and store them in the fridge or freezer. When you need a sandwich in a hurry, just grab a bag and a couple of slices of bread and you’re all set!
  • Toasting Trick
    Love toasted bread but not the way it can tear up your mouth? Next time, put both slices of bread into the same toaster slot. The outsides will get toasted while the insides stay soft.

Share your own sandwich hacks with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Don’t feel like making your own sandwich? Not a problem! Enjoy one of our yummy signature sandwiches in our dining room, on the patio, or have it delivered to your door. Find us on DoorDash or UberEATS, or visit us at 105 E. Arrow Highway in Pomona (on the northeast corner of Garey Avenue and Arrow Highway next to Johnny’s).

Healthy Benefits Of Peanut Butter & Jelly

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are a classic American favorite, and with good reason – they’re delicious! While these sandwiches may evoke sweet childhood memories or provide an occasional sweet treat, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches also provide some surprising health benefits. Read more to find out how healthy this yummy sandwich can be.

Protein
Protein contributes to healthy muscles, skin, hair, and teeth and plays a role in hormonal function. It also helps to keep blood healthy. A serving of peanut butter (2 tbsp) contains about 8g of protein, and using whole wheat bread can increase your protein intake.

Fiber
Fiber promotes regularity in digestion and helps control cholesterol levels. It also helps to keep you full longer. Luckily, jelly made from all fruit contains more fiber than other varieties, and peanut butter contains 2g per serving.

Healthy Fats
Did you know peanuts are a good source of heart-healthy fats? Unsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of developing heart disease. They also help your brain, skin, and even provide an energy boost. Peanut butter can provide some of these benefits, and, in moderation, jelly can be a healthy part of a low-fat and heart-healthy diet.

Antioxidants
Vitamin E is an antioxidant found in peanuts and can help protect your body from free-radical damage that contributes to the development of cancer and heart disease. In addition, resveratrol is another antioxidant found in peanuts and peanut butter that has potential to protect you from cancer and heart problems. It also has anti-aging, anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties, and offers protection for healthy brain function.

Vitamins
Jelly is made with fruit, thus, you increase your vitamin C intake when you consume it. Vitamin C is important for immunity, would healing and the health of your teeth and gums. While jelly contains trace amounts of some B vitamins, peanut butter is good source of several B vitamins, which are necessary for your body to use the energy it gets from the foods you eat. Niacin is one of the B vitamins found in peanut butter, and one serving offers 24% of your daily needs. And adequate intake of niacin could reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Another B vitamin found in peanut butter is folate, which helps prevent birth defects in gestating infants.

Minerals
As a whole, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich contains a few minerals including potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and calcium. Potassium helps to regulate a healthy blood pressure while magnesium and calcium play role in healthy bones. Zinc is important for vision and wound healing, and iron is a necessary nutrient for healthy blood oxygenation.

Did you know August is National Sandwich Month? Share your favorite sandwiches with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Stop by and celebrate National Sandwich Month with your favorite signature sandwiches from the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli! We’re open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm & Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. We also offer delivery via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Classic Southern Sandwiches

Aside from being absolutely delicious, part of a sandwich’s appeal is its versatility. You can create the sandwich of your dreams, made with your favorite ingredients, toppings, and condiments. Still, there are classic recipes we just can’t get enough of. If you’re from the South, you are probably familiar with these classic Southern sandwiches.

Fried Bologna Sandwich
Did you know bologna originally came from Bologna, Italy? If you order it there, you will actually get mortadella, a thick Italian ground sausage considered to be closely related to bologna with visible bits of lard and peppercorns. Bologna sausage is typically made with finely ground pork and is uniform in appearance with no visible pieces of lard.

Although bologna (or “baloney”) sandwiches are common throughout the U.S. and Canada, the fried bologna sandwich is a distinct favorite to America’s South. Known as the “poor man’s steak,” the bologna is fried on the grill and sandwiched between white bread, sometimes with mayo, sometimes with mustard, or sometimes both.

Collard Green Sandwich
Collard greens are a common southern side dish, however, are less known in sandwich form. This sandwich is made of cooked collard greens between two griddled hoecakes, or flat cornbread pancakes. Most southerners dip cornbread into collard greens to soak up the sauce, so it makes sense to turn it into a sandwich.

Pimento Cheese Sandwich
This is easily the most iconic sandwich of the South and is served at the Masters Golf Tournament in Augusta, Georgia every year. Pimentos (a type of sweet pepper related to the bell pepper) were imported from Spain in cans until 1908.

To make the spread, sharp cheddar cheese is mixed with lightly spicy pimento peppers, cream cheese, and mayonnaise. Next, spread a liberal amount on two pieces of white bread and you’ve got yourself a pimento cheese sandwich.

Cuban Sandwich
Its origins are arguable – some claim they were created in Cuba while others claim they originated in Tampa, Florida. The confusion probably stems from the fact that Cubans immigrated to Tampa and settled in the Ybor neighborhood in the late 1880s. Cuban sandwiches and coffee were delivered to female factory workers as they were discouraged from going to the general cafeterias.

The Cuban sandwich is generally made of Cuban bread, mustard, sliced roast pork, glazed ham, Swiss cheese, and thinly sliced dill pickles. Although many believe that and that alone makes a “true” Cuban sandwich, Tampa residents add salami layered in with other meats, and others include mayonnaise, lettuce and tomato.

Southern Tomato Sandwich
Simplicity at its finest is a great way to describe the Southern tomato sandwich, because it is exactly as it sounds. Thick, juicy tomato slices, Duke’s mayo (ask a Southerner) and white bread is all you need to make this sandwich. The key is to find seriously fresh tomatoes in the peak of summer, and in the South, that is not a hard feat.

Did we miss anything? Let us know and share your favorite sandwich from any region with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Visit the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli and let us make your favorite sandwiches fresh to order. Join us weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm for breakfast (served until 10:30am), sandwiches, salads, and baked goods. You can also get our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Food Safety For The Summer

Summer has arrived and it’s the season for backyard barbecues and outdoor gatherings. While it may be nice to host parties under the sun, the unpredictable weather and outdoor conditions may not be the safest place for food. Here are some food safety tips for your next outdoor summer party.

  • Choose Wisely

It can get extremely hot during the summer, and when you’re serving food outdoors, that makes it harder to maintain the safe temperatures for foods. To err on the side of caution, avoid foods that are highly sensitive to temperature and pose a high risk for foodborne illness. Instead choose hardy foods that don’t spoil easy and you can keep at the appropriate temperature.

  • Plan Ahead

Depending on your menu, be sure you have the right tools (coolers, warming stations, etc.) to keep your cold foods cold and your hot foods hot. Also, to avoid any cross contamination, have separate utensils and cutting boards for raw and cooked foods. Bring enough containers, plates and utensils for your guests and the amount of food you plan on serving. And designate an area to store food that is covered and protected pests or weather-related contaminants (ex. mud, blown leaves).

  • Serve Smartly

Whether you’re catering to a small or large group, it’s best to serve food in smaller batches. That way, the food will be used faster while maintaining the proper temperatures. And whenever replenishing food, do not pile on new food on top of old food – use a new container for the new batch.

  • Wash Your Hands

It’s not only important for food safety, but your health in general. Always wash your hands before and after handling food, whether you’re serving, eating, or cleaning up. Bring wet naps and hand sanitizer as backup.

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Got an upcoming party, baby shower, family gathering, or business meeting? Let us cater your next event! From sandwiches to salads to baked goods, we’ve got you covered. Give us a call 909-596-5225 for more information or visit us in store to discuss your options. We look forward to working with you!

Types Of Breads

When was that last time you ate bread? Unless there is a dietary or health issue that restricts your intake, for most of us, it was likely recently, maybe even today. From sandwiches and paninis to French toast or bread pudding, the recipes are seemingly endless. Moderation is key, but as versatile and inexpensive as it is, it’s hard not to love bread in all shapes and forms. Here are some common types of bread you may or may not be familiar with already.

  • Ciabatta
    Ciabatta translates to slipper, and is named for its resemblance to the footwear. This Italian bread is made with wheat flour, salt, yeast, and water, although its texture and crust will vary throughout Italy. Ciabatta bread is perfect for sandwiches and paninis.
  • Whole Wheat Bread
    Whole wheat bread is made from flour that uses almost the entire wheat grain (with the bran and germ intact). Because of this, you get more nutrients and fiber with whole wheat bread than white bread. Again, this bread is great for sandwiches or egg in a hole (just as it sounds).
  • Sourdough
    This yeasted bread is made from a starter, which is a fermented mixture of flour and water that makes many batches of bread. Sourdough bread boasts a substantial crust with a soft and chewy center and large air bubbles. This bread is ideal for grilled cheese sandwiches.
  • Rye Bread
    Made with a combination of bread flour and rye flour, this bread has a bold rye flavor and a tight crumb. Caraway or dill seeds are often added, giving it an earthy flavor. Rye bread is almost always used for classic pastrami and corned beef sandwiches.
  • Pita Bread
    Pita is a leavened flatbread made of wheat flour and originates in the Middle East. It is cooked at high temperatures, forcing the liquid in the dough to escape and forming a large air bubble in the center. When cut in half, this air-bubble becomes a pocket – wonderful for hand-held falafel sandwich. When cut into wedges and toasted, pita is also excellent for dipping.
  • Focaccia
    This Italian bread is typically baked flat in a baking sheet or pan, and often coated with olive oil beforehand for a delicate yet crunchy crust. Similar to pizza dough, foccacia is sometimes flavored with fresh herbs and garlic. With that said, it is enjoyable on its own, for dipping in soup, served with meat and cheese – versatility at its finest.
  • Multigrain
    Just as it sounds, this bread is loaded with grains like barley, flax, millet, and oats, and has a rich, earthy flavor. Try using hearty multigrain bread for your avocado toast.
  • Brioche
    This French bread is made with eggs and butter, and gets an egg wash just before baking. This results in a completely soft crust with a beautiful golden hue. It’s light with a subtle sweetness and a tight crumb. Brioche is best when it’s made into French toast.

What’s your favorite type of bread? Share with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

We carry a variety of different breads to create yummy sandwiches for you. Stop in today for your favorite sandwiches, salads, and baked goods! We are located on the northeast corner of Garey Avenue and East Arrow Highway in Pomona (next to Johnny’s – 105 E. Arrow Hwy). You can also have our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Step Up Your Sandwiches

It’s no secret that at the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli, we are passionate about good, yummy sandwiches made fresh from the finest ingredients. We love creating our signature sandwiches for you, fresh to order. But if you’re creating your own masterpieces at home, heed these smart sandwich tips from the Sandwich King himself, Jeff Mauro.

  • Put the extra effort in to melt the cheese or cook up some of the sandwich components. This extra step takes sandwiches to the next level.
  • Consider the bread you are using. With so many varieties available (ex. sliced bread, rolls, subs), think about the sandwich you are creating and how the type of bread can enhance it.
  • Condiments can really compliment a sandwich, adding an extra layer of flavor and moisture. And don’t be afraid to use more than one condiment. Layer different flavors and see how they work together, or use them as a marinade for meats.
  • Proper sandwich ratios are a must. Your choice ingredients should be proportional to the sandwich size. Feel free to pile your sandwich high, but be sure the elements are relative in size, otherwise your creation may be impossible (or extra messy) to eat.

Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest to share your own sandwich tips!

No time to make a sandwich at home? Visit the Brick and we’ll make your favorite sandwich fresh to order. Join us weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm for yummy sandwiches or breakfast served until 10:30am.

April Is National BLT Sandwich Month

April is National BLT Sandwich Month, and, honestly, who doesn’t love a classic BLT sandwich? Whether you prefer the BLT sandwich its pure form or a variation of it (such as the turkey club, or a vegetarian/vegan version), we can all agree that its simplicity is its genius.

Bread
While many may argue that a BLT belongs on white bread and white bread only, others believe that fresh baked bread from the bakery is the way to go. Whatever your preference (white, wheat, sourdough, ciabatta), most of us agree that the bread is meant to be toasted. You can toast it in the toaster, a toaster oven, pop it into your oven broiler or butter it up and toast it on the skillet.

Bacon
Sure you can fry your bacon it in the pan or on a cast-iron skillet, but baking it in the oven is easy and great for when you need to feed the masses. And whether you go with the normal or thick cut bacon is all up to your preference.

Lettuce
Iceberg is often the go-to, whether you use whole leaves or shredded iceberg lettuce. But anything with a nice crunch, like Romaine or even Bibb lettuce, can be a great substitute or addition. You may even consider adding arugula for a peppery bite, or spinach to up your nutrient intake.

Tomato
There’s no denying that heirloom tomatoes are the tomatoes for a BLT sandwich. Any tomato is fine if you’re in a pinch, but there’s just something about the hearty heirloom. Regardless of the tomato you use, remember to season your tomatoes with salt and pepper.

Condiments
Mayo lovers will agree that it is also a key ingredient, but those who hate it could do without. If you’re feeling experimental, you can try an aioli or even your favorite mustard, just to give your sandwich some kind of moisture.

Additions
Purists would stop there, but, much like a grilled cheese, eaters like to try out new and different ingredients.  For example, you can try avocado, whether in slices or mashed up. A fried egg can help this sandwich masquerade as breakfast.

How do you prefer your BLT sandwiches? What other additions or rules would you like to add? Share with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Let us make a BLT sandwich, or any of our signature sandwiches, to your liking! Visit us weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm for yummy sandwiches and salads made fresh to order with the finest ingredients available. We also make delicious baked goods in-house, so come in and satisfy that sweet tooth, too!

Popular St. Patrick’s Day Foods

This Sunday is St. Patrick’s Day – a holiday in which many of us don green apparel and indulge in Irish food and drinks. But some of the iconic dishes we associate with the holiday are not that authentic. Find out more about the history of these St. Patrick’s Day foods.

Corned Beef & Cabbage
Beloved by many beyond the holiday, corned beef and cabbage surprisingly is not something you would eat in Ireland to celebrate, despite its popularity in the U.S. So how did it come to be closely tied with the Irish culture?

During the time of the Irish immigration to the U.S., the first generation of Irish Americans were looking comfort food from home. Because they couldn’t afford pricey pork and bacon products, they turned to beef brisket, the cheapest cut of meat. They then adopted the brining technique of the Eastern Europeans. They used corn-sized salt crystals during the brining process, and thus, corned beef was born. It was then paired with cabbage since it was one of the cheapest vegetables available.

Irish Soda Bread
The misleading name may make you think there is Coke or Pepsi in this bread, but that is not the case. “Soda” refers to bicarbonate of soda, or baking soda, which is a leavening agent and one of the main elements that gives this bread its distinct flavor. Back then, bread was baked over an open fire in a round pot or casserole, or baked on an iron plate over remaining embers. This explains why the bread is round and cut into pie pieces. Traditional Irish soda bread is plain, although you may find it flecked with currants or other fruits in the United States. Fruits are only added for special occasions, in which case the bread goes by a different name.

Guinness
The inspiration for this Irish stout beer came from Great Britain, as it was created in the style of an English porter brew from the late 18th century. Arthur Guinness began making the tangy, creamy, dark beer at St. James’s Gate in Dublin in 1759. It took a decade for his ales to hit the public in England, and then 71 years later, they debuted in New York.

Colcannon
This traditional Irish dish is made of boiled potatoes mashed up with cabbage or kale, and then mixed with onions and butter or cream. The word “colcannon” comes from the Gaelic “cal ceannann” which translates to white-headed cabbage.

What Irish foods will you be enjoying on St. Patrick’s Day? Share with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Join us this weekend for a yummy Corned Beef & Swiss sandwich or any of your favorites! We’re located at 105 East Arrow Highway (the northeast corner of E Arrow Hwy & Garey Ave) and open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm & Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.

Making Sandwich Bread

If you’ve ever tried making homemade sandwich bread, you know it does not always go as planned. One misstep and you can end up with flat loaves, soggy middles or crumbly bread. Whether it’s your first or fiftieth time trying, here are some common sandwich bread making mistakes and tips to avoid them.

  • Under-kneading (or over-kneading) your dough.
    Under-kneaded dough often results in a lack of structure, holes in the middle, or will fall apart when you cut the loaf. Over-kneaded dough will produce dense, dry, and crumbly loaves.To avoid both, constantly check your dough during kneading rather than going by the time listed in the recipe. Keep kneading if it puddles in your hand or feels limp. Stop kneading if it starts to feel very tight in your hands. Your dough is ready when it is smooth, holds its shape in a ball, and springs back when you poke it.
  • Adding too much flour.
    We use flour to prevent the dough from sticking, but if you add too much, you can end up with dry, crumbly bread.If the dough seems too sticky when you begin, let it rest in the bowl for 30 minutes. This will give the flour time to absorb the liquid in the dough, making it less sticky and easier to knead. You may also try folding the dough rather than kneading it, as is the technique for sourdough bread.
  • Not shaping your loaf well enough.
    Once you shape your dough into a loaf and put it in the pan, it should have a taut, springy surface. Limp or loose loaves won’t rise properly and can end up flat and dense.You want to shape your dough by patting it down into a rectangle and then folding it like a letter. Then fold it in half again and make sure the surface is taut and smooth.
  • Not baking your bread long enough.
    No one wants under-baked bread. It will look dry and crusty on the outside, while the middle will still be gooey.To prevent this, use a thermometer. Fully baked sandwich loaves should be at least 190°F and no more than 210°F in the middle. Another trick is to slip the loaf out of the pan and thump the bottom – it should sound hollow. To err on the side of caution when you’re in doubt, bake your loaf a little longer.
  • Slicing your bread before it has cooled.
    As tempting as it may be to cut into a warm, freshly baked loaf of bread, please refrain. The cool down period is still a part of the cooking process, allowing the moisture inside to evaporate and the bread to firm up. If you cut your bread too soon, it may seem soggy or under-baked and your leftover bread will go stale much faster.Patience is the answer. It can take around two hours for a sandwich loaf to fully cool down – the bread should no longer feel warm on the sides or bottom when you touch it.

Share your own bread making tips with us and your peers on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Join the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli for breakfast or lunch six days a week! Breakfast is served until 10:30am and we are open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm.