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Sandwiches

Breads & Their Benefits

Bread has gotten a bad rap over the years thanks to its high ranking on the glycemic index scale. With white bread specifically, the sugars are quickly broken down and sent into the bloodstream. This causes blood sugar levels to spike and increases your chances for obesity and diabetes. Luckily, there are many other, healthier options for bread than white bread.

Ezekiel Bread
No added sugar and sprouted whole grains make Ezekiel bread a top choice. The sprouting process increases the amount and bio-availability of vitamins and minerals, and can be done either dry or wet.

Dry sprouting: Sprout the grain and then dry it to lock in the nutrients when they are at their peak. The sprouted grain can be stored until it is cooked or milled into sprouted grain flour to then make bread.

Wet sprouting: Mash wet, sprouted grains into a thick paste used to make breads, tortillas, and more (often described as “flourless”).

For vegetarians, Ezekiel bread is a great choice. It’s made from wheat, barley, beans, lentils, millet, and spelt, which, when all are sprouted and combined, create a complete protein similar to that found in milk and eggs. In addition, it also contains all nine essential amino acids.

Flaxseed Bread
Flax seeds are a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, especially for vegans since oily fish and fish oil are not an option. Flax seed and flaxseed bread can help reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes.

Rye Bread
Rye bread is made with rye flour which comes from a wheat-like plant. A study on mice that were fed whole grain diets based on either wheat or rye showed that whole grain rye reduced body weight, slightly improved insulin sensitivity, and lowered total cholesterol in mice. Other studies found that people who ate rye bread for breakfast had decreased hunger and desire to eat eight hours later in comparison to those who ate wheat bread.

Oat Bread
Oats are one of the healthiest sources of good carbs as they are slow-digesting, and thus, make you feel fuller longer. Oats also provide a high amount of beta-glucan (a cholesterol-lowering fiber) which has been shown to reduce certain cancers (such as colon cancer), diabetes, digestive problems, and heart disease. They also have more protein than wheat, and contain various vitamins (ex. vitamin E), and nutrients (ex. iron, calcium). Oat bread may contain whole grain oat groats, steel cut oats, and thick oats.

Whole Wheat Bread
When choosing whole wheat bread, be sure to choose 100% whole wheat versus enriched wheat flour. Although the U.S. requires manufacturers to enrich wheat flour with vitamins B1, B2, B3, and iron because processing takes over half of the nutrients out, the same amount that’s been depleted is not put back in. In its original, non-enriched form, whole wheat is a great source of dietary fiber, manganese, and magnesium.

Remember, in order for something to be whole wheat, the product has to be made from the entire wheat kernel. Therefore, whole wheat is one kind of whole grain. While all whole wheat is whole grain, not all whole grain is whole wheat.

Whole Grain
Whole grain foods contain a bevy of nutrients, fiber, and healthy plant compounds naturally found in the grain. You want to look for products that list the first ingredient as “whole wheat,” “whole oats,” or a similar whole grain.

For further clarification, whole grains can mean it has one of many types of healthy grains included, while whole wheat labels the specific grain that’s being used.

Multigrain Bread
Multigrain bread is another that may be confused with whole grain bread. Multigrain means a food has more than one type of grain, although they might not all be whole grains. You want to check the label to ensure that you are choosing multigrain bread with whole grains.

Brown Rice Bread
This is a great options for those who are vegan and gluten-free. With brown rice bread, you still get the benefits of fiber, proteins, thiamine, calcium, magnesium, fiber, and potassium natural to the rice, without gluten or any animal products/byproducts.

Gluten-Free Bread
With gluten-free bread, the wheat, rye and barley are substituted with cornstarch, rice flour, tapioca starch and potato flour. This bread should be reserved for those with Celiac disease or with gluten allergies since gluten-free diets are often stripped of lots of nutrients. If you have neither condition, try a different type of healthy bread on the list.

Sourdough
The making of sourdough bread is quote labor-intensive. The longer rise time increases the lactic acid and creates and ideal pH for the enzyme phytase. This enzyme breaks down phytates, which bind to minerals like iron, zinc, and manganese, slowing their absorption. The long fermentation process allows the bacteria to break down the carbs and gluten in the bread, making it easier to digest and releasing the nutrients so that they are easier to absorb.

Did we miss any other healthy breads? Share with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Don’t forget – our new store hours are in full effect! We are now open Monday-Friday 8:00am-7:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. Spread the word & join us for breakfast, lunch, or dinner!

Common Fried Chicken Mistakes

Did you know September is National Chicken Month? While we do love our Chicken Shawarma and Grilled Chicken sandwich, we can’t deny the deliciousness of fried chicken. The best fried chicken offers great flavor along with a crispy, crunchy exterior that houses juicy, moist meat. Before you fry some chicken at home, review these common fried chicken mistakes.

Mistake: Only Using Drumsticks.
Sure, the fried drumstick is a staple, but you can fry the whole bird. Separate the thighs from the drumsticks, and slice large chicken breasts into pieces (they will cook faster).

Mistake: Frying Fridge-Cold Chicken
If you want to do it right, let your chicken sit at room temperature for 30 minutes before frying. If you fry it straight from the fridge, the temperature of your oil will drop and the chicken will not cook evenly.

Mistake: Skipping The Brine
No one likes dry chicken and starting with brine will keep your chicken moist. If you opt to skip the brine, a four hour (or up to 24 hour) dip in seasoned buttermilk is recommended. You can use buttermilk in the breading process as well, but if you have the time, it doesn’t hurt the end product.

Mistake: Skipping The Breading
The breading is what makes each bite crispy and crunchy and keeps the moisture in. Want to successfully bread your chicken? Start with brine (semi-optional), flour, beaten egg and/or buttermilk, and more flour. Using flour before and after the liquid dip gives the egg/buttermilk something to cling on to. And during the last flour step, don’t shake off excess flour to create a better crust. Adding a little cornmeal to the flour in the last step adds more texture and crunch.
Bonus tip: Season every step of the way since you won’t be sprinkling the exposed meat directly with salt and pepper. For example, you can add a little cayenne to the flour or hot sauce to the egg/buttermilk if you like.

Mistake: Wasting Money On A Deep Fryer
To be honest, all you really need is a heavy-bottomed cast-iron skillet or Dutch oven.

Mistake: Using Oil With A Low Smoke Point
EVOO is tasty, but is not what you should use for fried chicken. Due to its low smoke point, you’ll be left with bitter-tasting chicken. Instead, choose neutral-tasting oil with a high smoke point, like canola, vegetable, or peanut oil.  And a thermometer is crucial to track and maintain the oil temperature (keep it at 350 degrees).

Mistake: Eyeballing The Temperature
Aside from using a thermometer to monitor the oil temperature, you need a meat thermometer to ensure the meat’s internal temperature is 165 degrees. You don’t want to risk having an evenly browned piece of chicken that’s raw on the inside. Remember that white meat cooks faster than dark meat. And don’t crowd the pan – this will lower the oil’s temperature, increase cooking time, and make the breading greasy.

Mistake: Letting The Chicken Cool On Paper Towels
While paper towels soak up excess fat, they also make your fried chicken soggy due to the steam. Drain your fried chicken on a wire rack over a baking sheet. This will enable your pieces to cool, crisp, and dry off all at once. Be sure to allow it enough time to cool to avoid searing-hot meat.

If you have any other fried chicken tips and tricks to share, feel free to share with us and your peers on our social media – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

In case you missed it, we’ll be extending our store hours! Starting October 1, 2019, we will be open Monday-Fridays 8:00am-7:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:00pm. We’ll be unveiling our dinner menu soon so stay tuned. In the meantime, stop by for a yummy breakfast or lunch made fresh to order!

Take Your Sandwich To The Next Level

So you’ve created your own sandwich masterpiece using your favorite fresh baked bread, topped it with your favorite ingredients. You’ve fashioned a balance of textures and flavors and are ready to dig in. But before you do, may we suggest finishing off your sandwich with a pan-fry? Whether your sandwich was on toasted bread or not, finish it with a pan-fry and your taste buds will thank you later. Here’s why:

  • These days, we eat with our eyes (or phones) first, and a pan-fried sandwich is a treat. Just imagine a golden, glistening pan-fried sandwich versus untoasted or dry bread.
  • Pan-frying your sandwich adds crispy texture that your sandwich may need. If you have a good balance within your sandwich, it simply adds another element, but if you have a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, for example, you might need that crispy texture to balance it out.
  • The bread is the first thing that hits your tongue, and pan-frying it ensures a delicious bite through and through.
  • If you’ve piled your sandwich high with yummy ingredients, it can benefit from pressing weight on top as you pan-fry it. This will flatten your sandwich to a mouth-fitting height, allowing you to get every ingredient in every bite.
  • The caramelized fat provides a subtle change of flavor that elevates any filling, sweet or savory.

Want to test it out? Here’s what you need to do:

  • You will need a hot skillet, a little butter or oil, and a heavy pot or pan to weigh your sandwich down – no fancy sandwich press needed.
  • Heat a pat of butter or a tablespoon of oil in a skillet over low to medium heat. Alternatively, you can spread the fat directly onto your bread slices before placing your sandwich on the hot pan. And if you feel so inclined, you can spread mayo instead of butter on the outside of the bread.
  • Cook your sandwich for about two minutes on each side, or until golden brown or any cheesy filling begins to melt. Place your weighted plate, lid, or pan on top of the sandwich to ensure total contact between bottom bread and hot pan. Allow both sides to crisp completely and serve warm.

When it comes to sandwiches and preferences, we believe to each their own. But we do think this finishing touch trick is worth shot. If you try it out or have other tips to share, let us know on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

If you’d rather leave the sandwich-making to us, feel free to join us Monday-Friday 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm (closed Sundays). We also offer catering services for your business meetings, parties, and special events. Call 909-596-5225 for more information.

Wrapping Sandwiches

Whether you order a sandwich from the shop or make it at home, we can all agree that the technique for wrapping a sandwich can be just as important as that sandwich building itself. A poorly wrapped sandwich can result in a soggy and sad mess. To keep your sandwich’s shape and hold the ingredients in place, utilize these sandwich wrapping techniques.

Before we begin, you will need parchment paper or waxed paper and tape. You can use the precut sandwich papers, or simply cut sheets straight from the roll. And if you have a hot sandwich, or are planning to slice your sandwich in half, aluminum foil will come in handy.

Flat Sandwiches
For flat sandwiches, you want to begin with a rectangular sheet of parchment (or waxed) paper. Set the paper on the work surface in front of you vertically (a.k.a. portrait, not landscape).

Place the sandwich in the center of the paper, and, if the bread has a discernible top, bottom and sides, set it so that the top is away from you.

Next, bring the top and bottom edges of the paper together over the center of the sandwich, and line them up. Fold the edges down by half an inch, crease sharply, and then continue folding in half-inch turns and creasing sharply until the fold is flush with the surface of the sandwich. The number of folds will vary depending on the size of your sandwich and the length of the paper.

The left and right sides of the paper will then look like flattened tubes. Starting on one side, use your fingers to press the opposing edges into the center, forming a pleated triangle. Press down and crease the triangles edges, including at the base of the sandwich, and then carefully fold it underneath. Repeat these steps with the other side.

If you are wrapping a hot sandwich, you may use this same method with foil instead; however, skipping the parchment paper may make it hard to eat on the go as the foil may cling to parts of your sandwich.

Subs & Wraps
For long sandwiches, it can be tricky since the measurement of your paper will depend on the size of your sandwich.  A good rule of thumb is to cut a piece of parchment paper that’s about one and a half times the length of your sub or wrap.

Again, begin by setting the paper down in front of you vertically (like with the flat sandwich), and then place the sandwich diagonally across the paper near one of the corners.

Next, lift the corner closest to the sandwich up and over the sandwich, and then press it flush. From there, roll the sandwich in paper toward the far opposite corner, folding in the sides as you go. Once the sandwich is fully rolled with everything tucked in, use a piece of tape to secure it.

And if your sandwich is hot, you can use this technique to wrap it with foil alone or over the paper.

For additional protection, you can place these wrapped sandwiches in a sturdy container to prevent smashing. And if you have any other sandwich wrapping tips or techniques, feel free to share with us and your peers on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Join us for signature sandwiches, fresh salads, and baked goods six days a week! We’re open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm (closed Sundays). Visit us in store or have your favorites delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Sharpen Your Sandwich Skills

As National Sandwich Month rolls on, we continue celebrating by enjoying scrumptious sandwiches. If you are looking to improve your sandwich making skills, check out some of these smart sandwich hacks.

  • It’s Got To Be Serrated
    When it comes to cutting sandwiches, always use a serrated knife to avoid a smashed mess. Because a serrated knife “saws” through your sandwich, it is less likely to result in a flattened or squashed sandwich. Whether you cut your sandwiches straight down the middle or diagonally is at your discretion.
  • No Mayo? No Problem!
    Instead of reaching for the mayo, try an avocado. Simply mash the avocado and spread it on your bread like you would with mayo. Not only is it healthier, but it can add a new element of flavor to your sandwiches.
  • Sturdy Sandwich
    No one likes it when their sandwich falls apart. To prevent this, layer the heaviest ingredients first, such as your meat and cheese. Next, add the medium weight ingredients like tomatoes or avocado, and then top it off with light toppings like lettuce.
  • Wrapping Technique
    Packing a sandwich for lunch or going on a picnic? Using the proper wrapping technique will prevent your sandwich from becoming soggy or squished. Start by wrapping your sandwich in a layer of parchment paper. This breathable wrap will prevent sogginess. Next, put the wrapped sandwich in a sturdy food container to keep it from getting squashed.
  • PB&J Time
    If you’re making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, to eat not or a little later, try spreading peanut butter on both pieces of bread (feel free to use as much or as little as you please). The peanut butter on both slices will prevent the jelly from bleeding through the bread.
  • Tastier Tomatoes
    After slicing your tomatoes, place the slices on a paper towel before putting them in your sandwich. This will prevent sogginess and gives you a chance to season your tomatoes beforehand.
  • Bread Variety
    If you want to switch up your sandwich routine, you can try changing the bread. Pita pockets, bagels or English muffins are great substitutes.
  • Cover It Up
    If you are using round meat slices, there’s a trick to maximizing your bread coverage. For the round meat slices into quarters and place them in each corner of the bread. Then continue adding until your bread is covered.
  • Prep It Good
    Assemble the interior of the sandwich by layering condiments in between slices of meat and cheese. Put each sandwich interior into a ziplock bag and store them in the fridge or freezer. When you need a sandwich in a hurry, just grab a bag and a couple of slices of bread and you’re all set!
  • Toasting Trick
    Love toasted bread but not the way it can tear up your mouth? Next time, put both slices of bread into the same toaster slot. The outsides will get toasted while the insides stay soft.

Share your own sandwich hacks with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Don’t feel like making your own sandwich? Not a problem! Enjoy one of our yummy signature sandwiches in our dining room, on the patio, or have it delivered to your door. Find us on DoorDash or UberEATS, or visit us at 105 E. Arrow Highway in Pomona (on the northeast corner of Garey Avenue and Arrow Highway next to Johnny’s).

Healthy Benefits Of Peanut Butter & Jelly

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are a classic American favorite, and with good reason – they’re delicious! While these sandwiches may evoke sweet childhood memories or provide an occasional sweet treat, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches also provide some surprising health benefits. Read more to find out how healthy this yummy sandwich can be.

Protein
Protein contributes to healthy muscles, skin, hair, and teeth and plays a role in hormonal function. It also helps to keep blood healthy. A serving of peanut butter (2 tbsp) contains about 8g of protein, and using whole wheat bread can increase your protein intake.

Fiber
Fiber promotes regularity in digestion and helps control cholesterol levels. It also helps to keep you full longer. Luckily, jelly made from all fruit contains more fiber than other varieties, and peanut butter contains 2g per serving.

Healthy Fats
Did you know peanuts are a good source of heart-healthy fats? Unsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of developing heart disease. They also help your brain, skin, and even provide an energy boost. Peanut butter can provide some of these benefits, and, in moderation, jelly can be a healthy part of a low-fat and heart-healthy diet.

Antioxidants
Vitamin E is an antioxidant found in peanuts and can help protect your body from free-radical damage that contributes to the development of cancer and heart disease. In addition, resveratrol is another antioxidant found in peanuts and peanut butter that has potential to protect you from cancer and heart problems. It also has anti-aging, anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties, and offers protection for healthy brain function.

Vitamins
Jelly is made with fruit, thus, you increase your vitamin C intake when you consume it. Vitamin C is important for immunity, would healing and the health of your teeth and gums. While jelly contains trace amounts of some B vitamins, peanut butter is good source of several B vitamins, which are necessary for your body to use the energy it gets from the foods you eat. Niacin is one of the B vitamins found in peanut butter, and one serving offers 24% of your daily needs. And adequate intake of niacin could reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Another B vitamin found in peanut butter is folate, which helps prevent birth defects in gestating infants.

Minerals
As a whole, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich contains a few minerals including potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and calcium. Potassium helps to regulate a healthy blood pressure while magnesium and calcium play role in healthy bones. Zinc is important for vision and wound healing, and iron is a necessary nutrient for healthy blood oxygenation.

Did you know August is National Sandwich Month? Share your favorite sandwiches with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Stop by and celebrate National Sandwich Month with your favorite signature sandwiches from the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli! We’re open weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm & Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm. We also offer delivery via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Classic Southern Sandwiches

Aside from being absolutely delicious, part of a sandwich’s appeal is its versatility. You can create the sandwich of your dreams, made with your favorite ingredients, toppings, and condiments. Still, there are classic recipes we just can’t get enough of. If you’re from the South, you are probably familiar with these classic Southern sandwiches.

Fried Bologna Sandwich
Did you know bologna originally came from Bologna, Italy? If you order it there, you will actually get mortadella, a thick Italian ground sausage considered to be closely related to bologna with visible bits of lard and peppercorns. Bologna sausage is typically made with finely ground pork and is uniform in appearance with no visible pieces of lard.

Although bologna (or “baloney”) sandwiches are common throughout the U.S. and Canada, the fried bologna sandwich is a distinct favorite to America’s South. Known as the “poor man’s steak,” the bologna is fried on the grill and sandwiched between white bread, sometimes with mayo, sometimes with mustard, or sometimes both.

Collard Green Sandwich
Collard greens are a common southern side dish, however, are less known in sandwich form. This sandwich is made of cooked collard greens between two griddled hoecakes, or flat cornbread pancakes. Most southerners dip cornbread into collard greens to soak up the sauce, so it makes sense to turn it into a sandwich.

Pimento Cheese Sandwich
This is easily the most iconic sandwich of the South and is served at the Masters Golf Tournament in Augusta, Georgia every year. Pimentos (a type of sweet pepper related to the bell pepper) were imported from Spain in cans until 1908.

To make the spread, sharp cheddar cheese is mixed with lightly spicy pimento peppers, cream cheese, and mayonnaise. Next, spread a liberal amount on two pieces of white bread and you’ve got yourself a pimento cheese sandwich.

Cuban Sandwich
Its origins are arguable – some claim they were created in Cuba while others claim they originated in Tampa, Florida. The confusion probably stems from the fact that Cubans immigrated to Tampa and settled in the Ybor neighborhood in the late 1880s. Cuban sandwiches and coffee were delivered to female factory workers as they were discouraged from going to the general cafeterias.

The Cuban sandwich is generally made of Cuban bread, mustard, sliced roast pork, glazed ham, Swiss cheese, and thinly sliced dill pickles. Although many believe that and that alone makes a “true” Cuban sandwich, Tampa residents add salami layered in with other meats, and others include mayonnaise, lettuce and tomato.

Southern Tomato Sandwich
Simplicity at its finest is a great way to describe the Southern tomato sandwich, because it is exactly as it sounds. Thick, juicy tomato slices, Duke’s mayo (ask a Southerner) and white bread is all you need to make this sandwich. The key is to find seriously fresh tomatoes in the peak of summer, and in the South, that is not a hard feat.

Did we miss anything? Let us know and share your favorite sandwich from any region with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Visit the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli and let us make your favorite sandwiches fresh to order. Join us weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm for breakfast (served until 10:30am), sandwiches, salads, and baked goods. You can also get our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Food Safety For The Summer

Summer has arrived and it’s the season for backyard barbecues and outdoor gatherings. While it may be nice to host parties under the sun, the unpredictable weather and outdoor conditions may not be the safest place for food. Here are some food safety tips for your next outdoor summer party.

  • Choose Wisely

It can get extremely hot during the summer, and when you’re serving food outdoors, that makes it harder to maintain the safe temperatures for foods. To err on the side of caution, avoid foods that are highly sensitive to temperature and pose a high risk for foodborne illness. Instead choose hardy foods that don’t spoil easy and you can keep at the appropriate temperature.

  • Plan Ahead

Depending on your menu, be sure you have the right tools (coolers, warming stations, etc.) to keep your cold foods cold and your hot foods hot. Also, to avoid any cross contamination, have separate utensils and cutting boards for raw and cooked foods. Bring enough containers, plates and utensils for your guests and the amount of food you plan on serving. And designate an area to store food that is covered and protected pests or weather-related contaminants (ex. mud, blown leaves).

  • Serve Smartly

Whether you’re catering to a small or large group, it’s best to serve food in smaller batches. That way, the food will be used faster while maintaining the proper temperatures. And whenever replenishing food, do not pile on new food on top of old food – use a new container for the new batch.

  • Wash Your Hands

It’s not only important for food safety, but your health in general. Always wash your hands before and after handling food, whether you’re serving, eating, or cleaning up. Bring wet naps and hand sanitizer as backup.

Share your own food safety tips with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Got an upcoming party, baby shower, family gathering, or business meeting? Let us cater your next event! From sandwiches to salads to baked goods, we’ve got you covered. Give us a call 909-596-5225 for more information or visit us in store to discuss your options. We look forward to working with you!

Types Of Breads

When was that last time you ate bread? Unless there is a dietary or health issue that restricts your intake, for most of us, it was likely recently, maybe even today. From sandwiches and paninis to French toast or bread pudding, the recipes are seemingly endless. Moderation is key, but as versatile and inexpensive as it is, it’s hard not to love bread in all shapes and forms. Here are some common types of bread you may or may not be familiar with already.

  • Ciabatta
    Ciabatta translates to slipper, and is named for its resemblance to the footwear. This Italian bread is made with wheat flour, salt, yeast, and water, although its texture and crust will vary throughout Italy. Ciabatta bread is perfect for sandwiches and paninis.
  • Whole Wheat Bread
    Whole wheat bread is made from flour that uses almost the entire wheat grain (with the bran and germ intact). Because of this, you get more nutrients and fiber with whole wheat bread than white bread. Again, this bread is great for sandwiches or egg in a hole (just as it sounds).
  • Sourdough
    This yeasted bread is made from a starter, which is a fermented mixture of flour and water that makes many batches of bread. Sourdough bread boasts a substantial crust with a soft and chewy center and large air bubbles. This bread is ideal for grilled cheese sandwiches.
  • Rye Bread
    Made with a combination of bread flour and rye flour, this bread has a bold rye flavor and a tight crumb. Caraway or dill seeds are often added, giving it an earthy flavor. Rye bread is almost always used for classic pastrami and corned beef sandwiches.
  • Pita Bread
    Pita is a leavened flatbread made of wheat flour and originates in the Middle East. It is cooked at high temperatures, forcing the liquid in the dough to escape and forming a large air bubble in the center. When cut in half, this air-bubble becomes a pocket – wonderful for hand-held falafel sandwich. When cut into wedges and toasted, pita is also excellent for dipping.
  • Focaccia
    This Italian bread is typically baked flat in a baking sheet or pan, and often coated with olive oil beforehand for a delicate yet crunchy crust. Similar to pizza dough, foccacia is sometimes flavored with fresh herbs and garlic. With that said, it is enjoyable on its own, for dipping in soup, served with meat and cheese – versatility at its finest.
  • Multigrain
    Just as it sounds, this bread is loaded with grains like barley, flax, millet, and oats, and has a rich, earthy flavor. Try using hearty multigrain bread for your avocado toast.
  • Brioche
    This French bread is made with eggs and butter, and gets an egg wash just before baking. This results in a completely soft crust with a beautiful golden hue. It’s light with a subtle sweetness and a tight crumb. Brioche is best when it’s made into French toast.

What’s your favorite type of bread? Share with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest!

We carry a variety of different breads to create yummy sandwiches for you. Stop in today for your favorite sandwiches, salads, and baked goods! We are located on the northeast corner of Garey Avenue and East Arrow Highway in Pomona (next to Johnny’s – 105 E. Arrow Hwy). You can also have our food delivered via DoorDash or UberEATS.

Step Up Your Sandwiches

It’s no secret that at the Brick Your Neighborhood Deli, we are passionate about good, yummy sandwiches made fresh from the finest ingredients. We love creating our signature sandwiches for you, fresh to order. But if you’re creating your own masterpieces at home, heed these smart sandwich tips from the Sandwich King himself, Jeff Mauro.

  • Put the extra effort in to melt the cheese or cook up some of the sandwich components. This extra step takes sandwiches to the next level.
  • Consider the bread you are using. With so many varieties available (ex. sliced bread, rolls, subs), think about the sandwich you are creating and how the type of bread can enhance it.
  • Condiments can really compliment a sandwich, adding an extra layer of flavor and moisture. And don’t be afraid to use more than one condiment. Layer different flavors and see how they work together, or use them as a marinade for meats.
  • Proper sandwich ratios are a must. Your choice ingredients should be proportional to the sandwich size. Feel free to pile your sandwich high, but be sure the elements are relative in size, otherwise your creation may be impossible (or extra messy) to eat.

Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest to share your own sandwich tips!

No time to make a sandwich at home? Visit the Brick and we’ll make your favorite sandwich fresh to order. Join us weekdays 7:00am-4:00pm and Saturdays 8:00am-4:30pm for yummy sandwiches or breakfast served until 10:30am.